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We offer distance learning courses that are recommended for College Credit by the NCCRS in the following subjects:

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    A Social History of Jewish Food (SOC-302)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Sociology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate a broad and intensive knowledge of Jewish food practices from Biblical times through present day, inclusive of Ashekenazic and Sephardic customs as well as current American and Israeli food; explain the religious and symbolic reasons for special festival foods, unique weekday foods, and food taboos; compare and contrast the differences between Jewish cultures and reasons for food variety; identify patterns in factors that affect Jewish food choices; and discuss various definitions and opinions of what is considered Jewish food.< Instructions:
    This self-study course assess students’ knowledge of the social history of Jewish food, including Biblical and Talmudic concepts and rules of food and customs that have been adopted over the centuries in Jewish settlements in the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and more recently in the United States and Israel. Major topics include: how foods are used for ritual and festival purposes, how Jews played a role in spreading foods to other cultures, and modern attitudes of Jews toward different types of cuisine and different reasons for their food choices and the respective sociologically significance.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, Religion, Nutritional Science, or as General Elective (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Abnormal Psychology (PSY-302)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the development of abnormal psychology, assessment and diagnosis approach, and research methods; analyze the symptoms, prevalence, causes, and treatments for disorders related to anxiety, somatic, mood/suicide, and eating; discuss the impact of psychology on physical health, symptoms, prevalence, causes, and treatments for sexual addiction, impulse control, and personality/schizophrenia-related disorders; investigate neuro-developmental and neuro-cognitive disorders and the legal and ethical issues associated with mental health service provision.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course explores the prevalence, symptoms, causes, and treatments related to major psychological disorders, including: anxiety, somatic, mood, eating, sleep cycle, stress, sexual, addiction, personality, and schizophrenia-related disorders. Other topics include: historical developments, assessment and diagnostic approaches, and research methods in the discipline, along with current legal and ethical perspectives. Detailed case studies and concept checks help students examine and apply what they have learned. Unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major (Version 2.0, August 2013).

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education programs (12/14).


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    American Literature Survey: 1900 to Present (ENG-202)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    English

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define literary canon, including issues of history, culture, race, ethnicity, and gender; identify and analyze fundamental literary elements and devices within a text; utilize a wide range of literary terms relating to literary history; synthesize ideas in literary form and use literary terms in correct historical context; and develop and carry out research-based writings formulated on literary context including locating, evaluating, organizing, and incorporating information; write clear and grammatically correct sentences; and correctly utilize MLA format to all written work.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course provides students with an overview of the important writers and works of American Literature from World War II to contemporary times. Class discussions focus on nonfiction essays, documents, poems, speeches, and short stories and their relevance to respective historical time periods. Students are responsible for reading required works and choose supplemental readings in a genre of their choice to enhance their literary education. Major topics include: Twentieth Century Literature, Confessional Poetry, Short Stories, Asian American writers, Native American writers, Pulitzer Prize Award Winners, Humor, Modern Memoir, Historical Fiction, Science Fiction, Popular books, and bestseller lists.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or Literature (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    American Literature Survey: Early America to 1900 (ENG-201)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    English

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: recognize and appreciate the importance of American Literary texts; perform close readings and explicate texts written in various modes; identify and analyze fundamental literary elements and devices within various texts including nonfiction, fiction, speech, and poetry; synthesize ideas in literary form and use literary terms in correct historical context; develop and carry out research-based writings formulated on literary context including locating, evaluating, organizing, and incorporating information; write clear and grammatically correct sentences; and correctly apply MLA format to all written work.

    Instruction:
    This self-study course provides students with an overview of the important writers and works of 500 years of American Literature from Early America to World War II. Class discussions focus on nonfiction essays, documents, poems, speeches, and short stories and their relevance to respective historical time periods. Students are responsible for required works and choose supplemental readings in a genre of their choice to enhance and inform their literary education. Major topics include: Literature of Early America-Colonial, Literature of the Eighteenth Century, Defining America and Americans, Early to Mid-Nineteenth Century, Romanticism, Transcendentalism, Humor and Satire, and finding meaning.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or Literature (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Analyzing Children’s Literature (ECE-304)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Education

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze children’s literature through multiple literary elements; compare various genres within children’s literature; articulate interpretations and discuss deeper meanings within children’s literature; identify ideologies within children’s literature; employ rhetorical modes to develop and write a literary analysis; and discuss themes in children’s literature, including: social differences, family relations, independence, and others.

    Instruction:
    This course explores a wide selection of children’s literature. Students examine the impact children’s literature has had on various generations. Major topics include: genres such as children’s classics, poetry, realistic fiction, folk and fairy tales, gender issues, and realism versus fantasy. Students take a deeper look at the stories they read as children and use literary elements such as themes, symbolism, characterization, and plot to analyze works written for children.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Children’s Literature, Early Childhood Education, or Elementary Education (8/18).


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    Anatomy and Physiology I (SCI-201)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2016 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Allied Health

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learners Outcome:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and describe the significance of various organ systems in the body; describe the biochemical principles that allow cells, tissues and organs to function; describe the way in which the skeletal and muscular systems cooperate for life processes such as locomotion; discuss the various ways in which the body is regulated, including the roles of the nervous and endocrine systems; determine which disruptions to homeostasis are likely to result from various external and internal stimuli; explain homeostasis and the threats that can arise from its disruption; identify tests that are conducted to diagnose problems with the functioning of the human anatomy; and relate the lessons of the human anatomy to principles that allied health professionals are required to use on a daily basis.

    Instructions:
    Anatomy and Physiology I covers a variety of subjects that relate to the human body, with an emphasis on information needed by aspiring health professionals. The course discusses the physiology of the human body, including surveys of the major organ systems of the body as well as the underlying biochemistry and cellular concepts that are the building blocks for human life. The course also focuses on diseases that impact the various human systems and the ways in which the body itself and treatment from health professionals can help maintain homeostasis. The course concludes with the way in which the human anatomy changes over time and the differences between healthy aging and problems that tend to affect the body as we age. Instruction is offered in the form of a course syllabus and study guide, an assigned textbook with reading assignments, a PowerPoint study guide and provided audio/visual presentations. Students are expected to complete the course of study set forth in the syllabus to properly prepare for the final examination. The course also includes an optional online lab component provided by PhysioEx (please see the syllabus for details). Students may complete the course without the lab component for 3 semester hours or complete the course with lab component for 4 semester hours.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the associate/certificate degree category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biological Sciences (6/16).

    NOTE:
    With the lab component, in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Biological Sciences (6/16).

    NOTE:
    To complete course with the lab component, students must submit lab reports in accordance with the course syllabus, in addition to taking the final examination.


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    Anatomy and Physiology I + Lab (SCI 201)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2016 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Allied Health

    Number of Credits:
    4

    Learners Outcome:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and describe the significance of various organ systems in the body; describe the biochemical principles that allow cells, tissues and organs to function; describe the way in which the skeletal and muscular systems cooperate for life processes such as locomotion; discuss the various ways in which the body is regulated, including the roles of the nervous and endocrine systems; determine which disruptions to homeostasis are likely to result from various external and internal stimuli; explain homeostasis and the threats that can arise from its disruption; identify tests that are conducted to diagnose problems with the functioning of the human anatomy; and relate the lessons of the human anatomy to principles that allied health professionals are required to use on a daily basis.

    Instructions:
    Anatomy and Physiology I covers a variety of subjects that relate to the human body, with an emphasis on information needed by aspiring health professionals. The course discusses the physiology of the human body, including surveys of the major organ systems of the body as well as the underlying biochemistry and cellular concepts that are the building blocks for human life. The course also focuses on diseases that impact the various human systems and the ways in which the body itself and treatment from health professionals can help maintain homeostasis. The course concludes with the way in which the human anatomy changes over time and the differences between healthy aging and problems that tend to affect the body as we age. Instruction is offered in the form of a course syllabus and study guide, an assigned textbook with reading assignments, a PowerPoint study guide and provided audio/visual presentations. Students are expected to complete the course of study set forth in the syllabus to properly prepare for the final examination. The course also includes an optional online lab component provided by PhysioEx (please see the syllabus for details). Students may complete the course without the lab component for 3 semester hours or complete the course with lab component for 4 semester hours.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the associate/certificate degree category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biological Sciences (6/16).

    NOTE:
    With the lab component, in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Biological Sciences (6/16).

    NOTE:
    To complete course with the lab component, students must submit lab reports in accordance with the course syllabus, in addition to taking the final examination.


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    Assessment in Early Childhood Education (ECE-310)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Education

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: explain the purposes of assessment in early childhood and how infants and young children are assessed; describe elements of a comprehensive assessment system for children of all ages; explain how assessment results are used for instruction and to evaluate the instructional program; discuss how the assessment process should be implemented during the school year with school-age children; describe how test scores are reported and how and when they should be shared with parents; evaluate the pros and cons of standardized testing as well as other types of objective assessments; assist in ensuring the development and maintenance of checklists, rating scales, and rubrics; describe the types of assessments used with preschool and primary-grade children; assist in the crafting of quality portfolio assessment systems; and describe model portfolio assessment and reporting systems.

    Instructions:
    This exam serves as an introduction to assessment in early childhood settings. Various means of assessment (i.e. formative, summative, authentic, traditional, etc.) when implemented properly can enhance the quality of instruction and enhance students’ learning.  The material included in this course is designed increase students’ understanding of the critical role valid and reliable classroom assessment has in supporting learning in the classroom.  Additionally, students explore how to evaluate assessment data for instructional decision-making.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).


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    Athletic Training and Therapy (HSC-201)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    January 2015 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Exercise Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the background for athletic training and its employment opportunities; discuss the components of the pre-participation physical exam and fitness testing procedures; relate nutritional health to performance and discuss the nutritional needs of the active individual; outline varying environmental conditions and describe how the illnesses they cause can be prevented; illustrate different forms of injury prevention and the liabilities inherent in sports training; describe how preexisting medical conditions affect the trainee and be able to recognize clinical injuries in all parts of the body; detect certain emergency situations and describe the role and responsibilities of EMS professionals; relate rehabilitation, healing, and drugs to therapeutic exercise and synthesize different treatment plans; and describe financial and human resource management strategies for personal trainers.

    Instructions:
    This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. It provides students with an extensive background in athletic training and acute and emergency care as a profession. Students who are coaching majors need to understand the extent of athletic trainers’ required knowledge and the importance of therapeutic intervention and health care administration so that they might better understand their role in the health care of physically active patients. Students who are majoring in athletic training will find in this essential background on which to build their complete education. Recommended Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology (SCI-201) or equivalent.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Athletic Training (1/15).


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    Bar and Beverage Management (HOS-203)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Culinary Arts and Event Planning

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain the chemical makeup of alcoholic beverages; describe the physiological effects of drinking alcohol; identify different types of establishments that serve alcoholic beverages; classify wines by their characteristics; identify the seven major spirits; and explain proper alcohol handling as stated by the National Restaurant Association’s Educational Foundation.

    Instruction:
    This is a self-study course that culminates in a final exam. Students are introduced to all the components of the Bar and Beverage Industry. Students are eligible to take the National Restaurant Associations ManageFirst Program’s exam upon completion of this course. The ManageFirst program is a management training certificate program that exemplifies the NRAEF’s commitment to developing materials by the industry and for the industry.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Hospitality, Culinary Arts, or Introduction to Bar and Beverage Management (8/18).


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    Buffet Catering and Garde Manger (HOS-201)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Culinary Arts and Event Planning

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: use various knives such as chef, boning, and paring to prepare foods; prepare amuse bouche, appetizers and Hors d’Oeuvres; create gourmet sandwiches, salads and finger foods; use various cookery methods such as roasting, steaming, frying, sautéing and poaching; assist in the preparation of food for buffets such as wedding banquets, receptions, cocktail parties and corporate events; and practice proper food handling and sanitation as stated in the National Restaurant Association’s Educational Foundation’s manual, ServSafe.

    Instruction:
    This course covers planning, production and supervision aspects of catering for special occasions such as receptions, teas, formal and informal meals and buffets. Major topics include: food preparation, cost of operation, equipment and labor requirements as well as the basic concepts and techniques of breakfast cooking and garde manger.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Advanced Culinary Arts, Garde Manger, or Hospitality (8/18).


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    Business Communications (BUS-222)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    test

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define the communication process and explain the importance of effective business communication; explain how diversity in organizations affects business communications; identify techniques and strategies for improving interpersonal communications; describe social media tools and explain how they are changing the nature of business communications; explain how computer technologies are used for communicating in the business environment, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, email, and presentation software); evaluate business messages, reports, and proposals; and develop and deliver oral presentations.

    Instruction:
    This course provide students with knowledge and skills to effectively communicate in global business environments. Students identify and use computer technologies and social media tools for conducting interpersonal communications with diverse organizations. Additionally, students develop and evaluate both written and oral business communications.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division associate/baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Communications, Cultural Studies, Arts, Education or College Success (8/17). NOTE: Completion of four writing assignments, one audio/visual presentation and a final examination, as outlined in the course syllabus, is a requirement for students who want to access credit recommendations.


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    Business Etiquette and Personal Development (BUS-160)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: summarize the changes affecting managerial; clarify why self-awareness is vital to professional effectiveness and well-being; develop a personal brand that is consistent with how it should be perceived; describe how trust contributes to individual and organizational effectiveness; contrast what does and does not predict happiness; explain how jobs can affect health; and analyze how to use cross-cultural etiquette effectively in an organization.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with professional behavior guidelines, including: suggestions on the standards of appearance, actions and attitude in the business environment, and handling a variety of social and business situations, networking meetings, and meals. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management, Marketing, or Human Resources (4/19).


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    Business Negotiation (BUS-355)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: summarize the stages and elements of the negotiation process; compile the skills and techniques of a successful negotiator; differentiate negotiation styles and mental models, analyze their own behavior in negotiations; contrast the methods to counter manipulation and psychological press in negotiations; discuss the actions taken at different stages of negotiations; explain the important of pre-negotiation and post-negotiation phases and compare the roles and functions in negotiation teams; analyze the skills of organizing and managing negotiation teams; clarify the purposes of the best alternative to a negotiated agreement; and differentiate between positions from interests in negotiations.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with the ability to develop analytical and communication skills necessary for successful negotiations, as a complex three-stage process, consisting of preparation, negotiating, and post-negotiation implementation and evaluation. Instruction combines both theoretical knowledge of leading negotiation scholars and practical experience through learning by doing. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management, Marketing, Paralegal Studies, Operations Management, Human Resources, or Entrepreneurship Studies (4/19).


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    Business Writing (ENG-102)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    English

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the centrality of clear and efficient writing in today’s business environment and the major obstacles therein; adjust sentence style to improve clarity, determination, and emphasis; create smooth and varied transitions between sentences and paragraphs; perform accurate audience analyses and correlate them with specific purposes; create coherent outlines and apply a range of other organizational techniques; distinguish between routine and non-routine communications between direct and indirect organizational plans; compose effective titles and closings for a range of business documents; discuss and apply strategies for motivation and persuasion and apply them to sales letters, claims, and proposals; successfully buffer and deliver bad news in adjustment letters and evaluations; responsibly gather data from both primary and secondary sources and analyze the data; and plan and execute periodic reports, project proposals, and research proposals.

    Instruction:
    This self-study course is designed to give students a conceptual understanding of what is important in various genres of business writing and the ability to competently execute documents in those genres. Students learn how to plan, compose, and execute effective business documents according to current professional standards. Major focus is on considerations of purpose, audience, organization, and style and provides both broad guidelines for composition and targeted strategies for specific kinds of documents. Special attention is given to the collection and analysis of data for use in reports and presentations.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Writing (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Calculus (MAT-302)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Mathematics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: specify the domain of a function; determine finite limits and limits at infinity; apply the definition of the derivative and rules for differentiation; solve applications involving derivatives; evaluate definite integrals graphically and using rules of integration; solve applications involving integration; compute derivatives and integrals of logarithmic and exponential functions; and apply techniques of integration to evaluate integrals.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students a working knowledge of the concepts in calculus. Major topics include: differential and integral calculus; limits, derivatives, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, integration, applications of integration, logarithmic and exponential functions, and integration techniques. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting, Business, Computer Science, Data Sciences, Engineering, Economics, Finance, Marketing, or Mathematics (4/19).


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    Career Counseling (PSY-325)
    Location:
    Various, distance learning format.

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced).

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Counseling and Social Work

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the historical development and theories of career development; compare the five career counseling models; describe the use of standardized tests and self-assessment procedures in career counseling; identify the ethical issues that a career counselor faces; describe the methods of career counseling for multicultural groups; analyze issues that arise when working with gender issues and dual careers; describe the hardships associated with job loss and transitions; analyze the career development and transition needs of working adults; and explain the facets of career-related programs for career development in elementary, middle and high schools.

    Instructions:
    This course provides a comprehensive understanding of the theoretical models of career counseling and practical techniques on how to counsel clients about career issues. Using a holistic approach, the values, temperament, talents and passions are integrated with personal counseling to determine the best career fit for clients.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Counseling, Educational Studies, Human Services, Social Sciences, or Psychology (8/18).


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    Child Development (PSY-230)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the theoretical perspectives of child development; explain the influences of genes and the environmental factors in development; compare different birthing procedures and the describe the choices that are available to parents; analyze the developmental norms of an infant and child and how to interpret them; summarize how attachment affects an individual’s social competence; investigate the ways that preschool children are educated; describe the ways children grow during the school years and the factors that influence their growth; list the types of relationships and friendships that are typical of middle childhood; and analyze the factors that affect adolescent school performance during school transition times.

    Instruction:
    This course provides an overview of the field of child and adolescent development. It covers childhood and adolescence chronologically, encompassing the prenatal period, infancy and toddlerhood, the preschool years, middle childhood, and adolescence. Within these periods, instruction focuses on physical, cognitive, and social and personality development.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/18).


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    Clinical Exercise Physiology I (SCI-303)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    January 2015 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Exercise Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the pathophysiology of the diseases covered in the course; select exercises for  patients based on their clinical considerations; evaluate patients’ medical history and apply when formulating exercise prescriptions; conduct a graded exercise test and  prescribe exercises for all people, both healthy and those with clinical and/or medical diseases; provide an exercise prescription and exercise training regimen specific to patients’ individual needs; and recommend exercise training to people of special populations with the consideration of their individual needs.

    Instruction:
    This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. The study covers a variety of physiological disorders and diseases that require special exercise considerations. The course first covers an introduction to clinical exercise and general skills such as examination and interview skills as well as exercise testing and prescribing. The course then shifts to a discussion of individual diseases and their related exercises. Endocrinology and metabolic disorders are discussed, followed by cardiovascular diseases. The pathophysiology, clinical considerations, and exercises as a part of treatment are discussed and applied for each disease. The scope of each disease is also described. The final examination will ask students to read a series of case studies and respond to questions on each one in paragraph form in order to demonstrate mastery of the materials.

    Recommended Prerequisite:
    Anatomy and Physiology.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Athletic Training, Exercise Physiology, or Exercise Science (1/15).


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    Clinical Exercise Physiology II (SCI-304)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    January 2015 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Exercise Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the pathophysiology of the diseases covered in the course; select exercises for  patients based on their clinical considerations; evaluate patients’ medical history and apply when formulating exercise prescriptions; conduct a graded exercise test and  prescribe exercises for all people, both healthy and those with clinical and/or medical diseases; provide an exercise prescription and exercise training regimen specific to patients’ individual needs; and recommend exercise training to people of special populations with the consideration of their individual needs.

    Instruction:
    This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. The study covers a variety of physiological disorders and diseases that require special exercise considerations. The course first covers respiratory diseases and the exercises which patients can perform to maintain or gain back their health, then shifts to a discussion of immune related diseases such as cancer. Clinical considerations, pathophysiology, and exercise training are described. The course also discusses disorders of bone and joints, as well as select neuromuscular disorders.  Finally, the course discusses special populations, including children, older adults, people with clinical depression, and people with intellectual disabilities. Within each topic, clinical considerations are factored in and the exercise training is described.The final examination asks students to read a series of case studies and respond to questions on each one in paragraph form in order to demonstrate mastery of the materials. Recommended Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology (SCI-201) or equivalent.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Athletic Training, Exercise Physiology, or Exercise Science (1/15).


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    Coaching: The Future of Wellness (NUT-320)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Nutrition

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define “coaching” and identify the requirements of being a coach; tailor healthcare coaching to a target population; identify the different types of coaching; discuss the psychology of coaching; discuss wellness, its demands, challenges, and needs; analyze the different applications of coaching in the healthcare industry; apply the science of coaching to practical use; apply the practical uses of wellness coaching; and discuss the challenges and needs of becoming a coach and building a successful practice.

    Instruction:
    This course examines the four pillars of health coaching: mindful presence, self-awareness, being in a safe and sacred place and authentic communication. The course focuses on coaching as a force of change for a healthcare system that is struggling to understand its patients and deliver its messages. It also looks at the application of coaching at the individual or group level and in person or through distant communication. This course is also designed to serve as an introduction to the science of coaching in general, and healthcare coaching.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Physical Education, Health and Wellness, Sport and Leisure studies, Health Coaching, or Personal Training (8/18).


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    College Algebra (MAT-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Mathematics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: use mathematical notations and expressions to represent variables and write algebraic expressions and equations; solve algebraic equations, including linear, quadratic, polynomials, roots, and rational functions; graph a mathematical function and apply basic transformations to the graph and corresponding equation; work with and manipulate exponential and logarithmic expressions; solve systems of linear and basic nonlinear equations and find solution sets of systems for inequalities; recognize equations that represent conic sections such as circles, ellipses, hyperbolas, and parabolas from mathematic equations and their graphic representations.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course is designed to provide students with the basic principles of algebra, including mathematical expressions such as polynomials, exponentials, and logarithms and their manipulations. The course also covers functions, graphs, inequalities, linear equations and quadratic equations and their solutions through algebra and graphing.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Algebra or Mathematics (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    College Geometry (MAT-103)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    November 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Mathematics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: solve real life problems using geometry; identify geometric shapes and characteristics of angles, lines, and shapes; determine whether a geometric figure is congruent and/or similar to another given figure and explain the reasons for such conclusion; calculate the perimeter, area, and volume of a variety of geometric figures; apply the rules of geometry of a circle and properties of lines and angles that run through one or more points on the circle’s circumference; plot points, lines, and geometric figures on a graph and use coordinate geometry rules to identify properties of these points, lines, and figures.

    Instruction:
    This self-study course is designed to provide students with the basic principles of geometry necessary for further college-level mathematics through textbook reading assignments, optional homework assignments, study guide, and both written and video lessons. Major topics include: properties of geometric shapes and measurements, calculating the dimensions, including one, two, and three-dimensional properties of geometric figures. Students discuss concepts such as similarity and congruency, geometric proofs establishing relationships between figures, characteristics of triangles, quadrilaterials, higher order polygons, circles, three dimensional figures and properties of the sides and angles appurtenant to these figures, and graphing and coordinate geometry.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Geometry, Mathematics, or as a general elective (11/14).


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    Comparing Political Systems of the World (PSC-201)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    September 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    History and Political Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe political systems and states; detail the process of fostering economic development; understand why political systems are compared; pinpoint the structures and functions of political systems; explicate why and how culture matters to political processes; identify trends shaping contemporary political cultures; explain how citizens participate in sociopolitical affairs in different societies; discuss the development of interest groups and describe their historical performances; define authoritarian party systems and their power structures; assess the prospects and challenges facing democracies and authoritarianism; trace the geographic distribution of government power; explain the process of community building; and present the common outcomes of international interactions and their generalities.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course is designed to provide students with a broad survey of the important issues in the study of comparative politics. Students will gain an understanding of world politics and political systems and compare issues and structures on a global level. Students conduct in-depth studies of individual countries focusing on theoretical frameworks to explore broad issues such as why some countries modernize more quickly and why some are more democratic and understand how local issues have a worldwide impact. Students also explore how politics works on individual, group, national, and global levels. Throughout the course, students study political institutions and processes and learn to use critical thinking skills regarding the consequences of public policies. Students observe the international economy and how politics shape a nation’s influence on the local and global levels. Additionally, students learn about other countries, regions, and the world while asking fundamental questions about politics and government.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Politics (9/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Computer Basics in Healthcare (TCH-201)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Allied Health

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learners Outcome:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: define healthcare information technology; summarize the major healthcare legal practices and regulations; identify proper communication methods for use in healthcare workplace; comprehend EHR/EMR access roles and responsibilities for using Protected Health Information (PHI); explain how to set up, troubleshoot, and configure devices to a desktop workstation using computing resources and languages; assist in setting up basic networks with EHR/EMRs in mind; Identify the uses for clinical software, and describe the steps in the clinical process; explain and identify medical interface components and diagnostics processes; describe different modes of data protection; identify areas of vulnerability and ways to protect wireless networks; and define encryption and how it can be used to secure healthcare data.

    Instructions:
    Computer Basics in Healthcare touches on fundamentals of healthcare, health information technology, and computer based management systems that support healthcare professionals and institutions.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Medical Billing and Coding, Medical Administrative Assisting, Medical Assisting, or Allied Health (6/17).


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    Computer Information Systems (TCH-110)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Computers and Information Technology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: consider and apply many considerations that must be applied to the interface and screen design process; describe rationale and rules for an effective interface design methodology; identify the components of interfaces and screens, including windows, menus, and controls; design and organize interfaces to encourage the fastest and most accurate comprehension and execution of screen features; choose screen colors and design screen icons and graphics; and perform the user interface design process, including interface development and testing.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course focuses on designing functional Web pages and applications utilizing proper interface design techniques. Topics include: techniques used in designing interactive functions involved in typical e-commerce and e-learning applications, human factors and accessible Web pages. This course presents the important practical guidelines for good interface and screen design. The guidelines reflect a mix of human behavior, science, and art, and are organized within the context of the interface design process.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Design (12/14).


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    Concepts in Math and Quantitative Analysis (MAT-301)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Mathematics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: convert realistic situations into mathematical concepts so that mathematical tools can be used to solve them; use Venn diagrams, graphs, charts and similar methods to represent, organize and analyze data; apply principles of logic to prove or disprove statements (both in text and in mathematical form) on the basis of other given statements; identify, manipulate and utilize mathematical expressions including rational, irrational and imaginary numbers, along with mathematical expressions such as absolute value, inequalities and radicals; use principles of algebra and geometry to identify variables and express algebraic expressions on graphs; determine the probability of a specified event or condition or series of events or conditions; and apply principles of statistics, such as averages, normal distributions and standard deviations to identify statistically significant data.

    Instructions:
    This exam is designed to develop students’ mathematic thinking and reasoning skills though problem-solving. The exam surveys many of the tools in the mathematical toolbox, including concepts in data sets, number systems, algebra, geometry, logic, graphing, probability and statistics. At each stage, students are expected to apply these tools to analytically solve problems. Familiarity with the basics of arithmetic, algebra and geometry is assumed, though the relevant concepts are reviewed where appropriate. Prerequisites: College Algebra and College Geometry or demonstrable skills in those areas, such as superior scores on standardized tests in those areas.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Math, Business, Finance, or as a general elective (6/17).


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    Constructing and Writing Logical Arguments (ENG-211)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    English

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: recognize and describe the types of arguments made in any persuasive argument; translate written plain language arguments into symbolic language; test arguments for validity using established principles of logical reasoning; communicate in writing in logically persuasive manners and use arguments that are logically valid; apply abstract logical principles to concrete arguments and circumstances; and distinguish between various types of reasoning, including inductive, deductive and analogical.

    Instruction:
    This exam is about determining whether an argument is sound using logical principles and teaches students to commit logical arguments to paper and to evaluate written arguments. Students use various types of reasoning, including inductive, deductive and analogical reasoning so they are better equipped to make determinations as to the validity of an argument.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or as a general elective (6/17).


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    Corporate Advertising and Branding (BUS-315)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe why brands have become so important; compare brand identity, image, and personality; explain how brands reduce consumers’ perceived risks; critique the “pyramid” from brand awareness to brand loyalty; measure brand equality and brand value; specify why brand position and brand image are not the same; explain how social media accelerates “word of mouth”; interpret how the three brand components are built over time; describe how the brand name, brand logo, slogan and spokesperson fit together; identify the ways in which the Internet has made almost all brands “global”; and analyze how personal branding can help individuals set goals for themselves.

    Instructions:
    This course introduces students to basic concepts of brands and brand management to help them analyze how a brand can affect customers’ perceptions of products and services, and to teach how successful branding strategies can be designed. The material is focused on the effective branding of products and services while building on the general fundamentals of strategic marketing. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communication, Business Management, Sales, Marketing, or Self-Management (4/19).


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    Creative Arts in the Classroom (ECE-350)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Education

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: examine the contributions of creativity and imagination to the total learning of the child; understand the scope and social and personal impact of the fine arts; explore methods of helping children discover the fine arts through practical experiences, materials, and museum experiences; promote understanding and appreciation of other cultures through research about prominent artists from various cultures, both globally and within the United States; and create and use an understanding of the arts and aesthetics in integrating the arts into other disciplines in the elementary curriculum.

    Instructions:
    This exam supports students as they examine children’s creative expression and critical thinking through art, drama, and music. Exam content reflects contemporary theory and practice and promotes ideas and skills that tap children’s propensity for creativity and critical thinking. Numerous strategies of arts integration and examples of learning content through the visual arts, music, dance, and poetry are discussed.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).


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    Culinary Arts Techniques (CUL-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    January 2015 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Culinary Arts and Event Planning

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe various aspects of the culinary profession; describe proper food safety and sanitation procedures; identify a variety of professional kitchen tools and the procedures necessary to use them safely; distinguish the various types of knives and discuss the best practices for their maintenance; select the proper flavorings to enhance a dish; describe how heat alters food through various heating mediums; select and describe various types of stocks and sauces; differentiate between and describe categories of soups; distinguish between the different cuts of beef, veal and lamb; distinguish between the types of poultry and describe their inspection and grading processes; identify a variety of vegetables and their proper storage procedures; describe the various types of potatoes, pastas and grains; select the best greens and vegetables, garnishes and dressing for cold salads; and differentiate varieties of fruits and identify the best practices for their storage.

    Instructions:

    This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. It is an overview of the field of culinary arts and is designed to provide a snapshot of the fundamentals of the culinary profession as well as background on the theories that apply to the use of ingredients and preparation of foods.  It focuses on the knowledge and skills a chef needs to operate and manage a food service operation and to prepare a variety of foods. The course also explores management areas such as food safety, sanitation, menu creation, recipe conversion, inventory and cost control.

    Credit Recommendation:

    In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Culinary Arts (1/15).


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    Culinary Math (CUL-203)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Culinary Arts and Event Planning

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: convert fractions to decimals and vice versa; convert percentage to a decimal and a decimal or fraction to a percentage; calculate kitchen ratios; calculate food cost; explain yield percentage; and identify common food service measures.

    Instruction:
    Students develop the math and calculation skills necessary for working in the culinary and hospitality fields. Major topics include: overviews of food cost calculation, units of measure, portion control, selling price, and yield percentage.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the associate/certificate degree category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Culinary Math, Food Cost Control, Hospitality, Restaurant Management, Culinary Arts, Catering or Resort Management (8/18).


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    Drugs, Society, and Human Behavior (PSY-305)
    Location:
    Various, distance learning format.

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced).

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Counseling and Social Work

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the effects of drug use in modern society; analyze how drugs work on the nervous system and the actions of drugs; investigate stimulants, depressants and what drugs are used for mental disorders; analyze aspects of alcohol from the distillation of it to the use and dependence on it; list and describe drugs that are commonly used, including tobacco, caffeine, dietary supplements and over-the-counter drugs; analyze opioids and describe the current epidemic that is a nationwide issue; compare substance abuse prevention programs; and critically analyze drug policy and analyze what works, what is possible and what is feasible.

    Instruction:
    This course explores the history and current information on drugs and their effects on society and human behaviors. Major topics include: drug use in modern society, how drugs work and detailed information on alcohol, stimulants, depressants as well as information on restricted drugs and familiar drugs, prevention programs and challenges the rethinking of drug policies and drug decriminalization.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Sciences, Social Work, Health Studies, or as an elective in Psychology (8/18).


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    Dynamic Web Design and Development (TCH-310)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    January 2015 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Computers and Information Technology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate competence in understanding how technological systems work and operate effectively; demonstrate selecting technology, which includes determining desired outcomes and applicable constraints.; demonstrate competence in applying technology to tasks; design and implement an application to solve business problems; and identify appropriate technology to solve business problems.

    Instructions:
    This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. Dynamic Web Design and Development is a self-study course building upon the principles introduced in the lower level courses. This course covers advanced navigational organization, selection, web page layouts, and embedding multimedia to enhance web sites. Other topics include: advanced concepts of dynamic media, interactive Web sites., gaming, ActionScript, and issues involved in generating and delivering content in a dynamic way. This class explores how to connect the front end (the Flash application) with dynamic data on the server. This course of study is necessary to be prepared for the final examination, which consists of reading, study guide and crash course video supplements.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Computer Information Systems, Information Systems, Information Technology, Information Technology Management, Web Design or Digital Media (1/15).


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    Early Childhood Curriculum (ECE-301)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Education

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: describe the characteristics of early childhood programs and describe the steps generally necessary to plan and apply developmentally appropriate practices; discuss the responsibilities of early childhood professionals and how they facilitate learning through effective lesson planning and group placement; describe how program quality depends on the development of differentiated instructional approaches to meet students’ needs; and evaluate the importance of building communication skills to communicate effectively with parents and coworkers.

    Instructions:
    This exam explores early childhood organizational plans, procedures, physical facilities and surveys appropriate materials and equipment. Emphasis is placed on the process of designing appropriate learning environments for young children and an integrated, developmental approach to curriculum and instruction in the early childhood education. The exam covers all aspects of classroom life, the roles of children and adults in education, the physical and social environments, and the multiple developmental domains for children in early childhood education and provides a collaborative approach to curriculum development in early childhood education.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).


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    Eastern European Jewish Immigration and Settlement in the United States (HIS-301)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    History and Political Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify sources of Jewish immigration in the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries; discuss challenges that immigrants faced in both cultural and socioeconomic areas; describe how Jewish immigrants typically earned a living; identify institutions that helped Jews of the late 1800s maintain their culture and identity; outline steps undertaken by Jews of this era to “Americanize” themselves and their culture; discuss political trends among the Jewish community from the 1880s through the middle and late Twentieth century; identify key people who shaped the political viewpoints of the Jewish community from the 1880s through the middle and late Twentieth century; discuss the contributions of Jewish-American immigrants to American culture in the areas of arts and entertainment and identify key contributors thereto and describe their roles; discuss the influence that the Jewish press had on Jewish communities and the general society; identify great outlets of Jewish media in the late Nineteenth century and early Twentieth century and describe basic characteristics; outline the progress made by the Jewish community over the course of several generations beginning in the 1880s progressing to present day; identify contributions of key Jewish scholars to American thought and politics; discuss the journey outward from the initial community centered in lower Manhattan to the present Jewish communities that span the United States; and outline modern day challenges faced by American Jews and explain typical solutions.

    Instruction:
    This self-study course follows the Jewish immigration and settlement in the United States and covers the Jewish experience of Jewish immigrants, coming primarily from Eastern Europe and settling in the United States. Major topics include: initial group of Jewish immigrant community to settle in the United States, development of the Jewish immigrant community from the 1800s to present day; hardships and trials established by early immigrants, increased successes of the community from financial and socioeconomic perspectives, contributions of the Jewish community to the American economy, government, and culture and famous and successful Jewish contributors in a variety of areas such entertainment, business, and art.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, Eastern European Studies, or as General Elective (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Educational Psychology (PSY-204)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the skills that make a good teacher and how to evaluate an intentional teacher; breakdown how children develop cognitively, socially and emotionally; examine the impact of culture on teaching and learning; analyze the principles of behavioral and cognitive learning; determine how direct instruction, student-centered and constructivist approaches to instruction influence intentional teaching; discuss the elements of effective instruction; investigate motivation for student performance; illustrate the characteristics of effective learning environments; identify learners with exceptionalities; assess student learning through standardized tests.

    Instruction:
    This course is the systematic study of learners, learning, and teaching. It emphasizes cognitive, social and moral development while also focusing on educational diversity. Instruction also focuses on motivating students to learn, creating effective learning environments and assessing student learning.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education or Psychology (8/18).


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    English Composition I (ENG-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    English

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: develop and refine the rhetorical voice; identify and employ rhetorical appeal in print visual media and use them correctly in their writing; discuss logical fallacies in text and visual media and learn to eliminate them in their writing; identify and analyze the use of value and descriptive assumptions; develop writing topics based on specific situations; write rhetorically and objectively on demand, using research sources; correctly apply MLA citation and formatting styles in all writing assignments; read and view with a keenly critical eye and mind; and integrate other writers’ work as an essential seamless part of writing. Additionally, students continue to develop standard composition skills, including: essay topics, thesis statements, outlines, topic sentences, grammar, mechanics, editing process, sources, and bibliographies.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course requires students to submit three graded written assignments and culminates with a final exam. Additionally, there are fourteen reading assignments that focus on critical reading and visual rhetoric with critical commentary; informative essay; and rhetorical analysis.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or Literature (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    English Composition II (ENG-104)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    English

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate mastery of clear and effective writing through carefully written analyses of exemplary models of literature; identify and apply various rhetorical modes in English Composition, focusing on the expository and argumentative approaches; identify elements of a theme and its evidence presented by the author throughout a piece of literature; effectively read and analyze a poem and its components, focusing on rhythm, how a poem sounds versus how it reads, and demonstrate improved mastery of word choice and poetic devices in the writing of poetry; actively engage literary works to develop creative interpretations through an individualized strong reading of classic short stories, poetry, and drama; compose a literary argument with appropriate documentation related to context from selected pieces of fiction; develop techniques for addressing opposing views to insure that the basic theme of a paper is adequately supported; recognize and assess the philosophical or analytic approaches that literary critics adopt as templates for understanding the meaning behind a piece of writing and identify potential bias of an author or critic; write an in-depth research paper demonstrating a discriminating focus upon what constitutes good literature and facility with MLA format and specific requirements for citing references; and recognize various forms of plagiarism, both benign and intentional.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course builds on the expository writing skills developed in English Composition I and helps students further develop critical writing and thinking skills through in-depth readings, analyses of literature, and translating thoughts across a range of disciplines. Students read a variety of genres including fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry and develop their own interpretation with greater clarity and depth. Students also employ literary theories that distinguish between literal and figurative meaning as well as cultural, political, or philosophical underpinnings of particular literary pieces. Students research and address opposing views of critics’ interpretations of literary works and assert their own positions. Major topics include: Themes in Fiction, Poetry, Writing Literary Arguments, Literary Criticism, and Critical Thinking about Writing.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in College Composition II, Literary Research Methods, or as Liberal Arts elective (9/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Environmental Science (SCI-104)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Science

    Number of Credits:
    4

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the different types of ecological communities and describe the manners in which such communities interact with their biotic and abiotic environments; evaluate the role of human activities in generating pollution, deforestation and other such activities on their environment; analyze the manner in which humans and other living organisms are able to adapt to the environments of the various biomes that make up the Earth’s biosphere;analyze the pros and cons of obtaining energy from various sources including nuclear, coal, oil, biomass, solar, etc.; and create proposed solutions to the problem of increased carbon (and methane) emissions that causes anthropogenic global warming.

    Instruction:
    This self-study course is designed to cover a variety of issues that relate to the environment and the human impact on the ecosphere. The course examines the various biotic and abiotic factors that contribute to the environment and its health. Students examine the various biomes and climates that cover the Earth and the factors that distinguish them and human activities and their effects on the environment, including discussion of global climate change, deforestation, extinctions caused by human encroachment, etc.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Environmental Science or as a core science requirement, including a laboratory component (6/14).


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    Essentials of Earth Science (SCI-103)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    Version 1: May 2013 - July 2018. Version 2: August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply the scientific method and conduct scientific inquiry and gathering of data; describe the structure of the Earth’s interior and explain how different layers are identified; explain the composition of various types of rocks and minerals; outline the processes of weathering and erosion, including running water, glaciers, wind, etc.; relate plate tectonics and the dynamic earth to earthquakes, volcanoes, and the formation of mountains; interpret data relating to earthquakes such as “p” and “s” waves and Richter scale values; explain the structure and composition of the atmosphere, including its features such as temperature, air pressure, and moisture; identify the effects of air pressure, temperature, wind, and other meteorological data on weather and weather patterns; interpret the effects of air masses, moving air masses, and fronts on weather on weather disturbances such as hurricanes and tornadoes; identify characteristics of various climate types; and discuss the impact of human activity on the weather and climate on Earth, including concept of greenhouse gas emission and its effect on global climate.

    Instructions:
    Version 1 and 2: This self-study course covers a variety of scientific disciplines that relate to the composition of Earth and its dynamic nature and position in space. Major topics include: composition of the Earth’s surface and the Earth itself, including rocks and minerals and the weathering, erosion, and deposition that shape the Earth’s surface, Earthquakes and Volcanic activity, Meteorology (weather, air masses, precipitation, fronts, etc.), Climate, Climate Change, and Impact of Human Activities on the Earth’s Climate.

    Credit Recommendation:
    Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Earth Science or as a core science requirement (11/13). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Earth Science or as a core science requirement (8/18 revalidation).


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    Family Therapy (PSY-306)
    Location:
    Various, distance learning format.

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced).

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Counseling and Social Work

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the social context of family therapy; analyze the circumstances that led to the development of family therapy; list the founders and their theories of family therapy; analyze the basic techniques for the different therapy styles; compare the foundational therapies of cybernetics, system theory, social constructionism and attachment theory; investigate the classic schools of family therapy: Bowen, strategic, structural, experiential, psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavioral family therapy; describe the recent developments in family therapy; compare and contrast the views of different models in family development; analyze the gap between clinical practice and scientific research for a basic understanding of the methods family researchers use to empirically test their ideas.

    Instruction:
    This course explores the history and contemporary practice of the family therapy field. It emphasizes ideas and techniques with a clear focus on clinical practice. This course also encourages students to explore the history, the classic schools, and the latest developments in the field.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Sciences, Social Work, Psychology, or Counseling (8/18).


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    Family-Centered Early Education (ECE-230)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Education

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: assist in the creation of a program where learning, caring, and parental collaboration exists; interact with students from diverse backgrounds; develop a culturally sensitive partnership between home and school that encourages various methods of volunteering; assist in the development of policies that foment a culturally and linguistically appropriate ecology that encourages learning; and describe historical development of views on children and how those views affect family life.

    Instructions:
    This exam provides the guidelines for creating effective partnerships with families. It provides an overview of the diversity of modern families. The emphasis is on examining elements that create successful partnerships and programs that work. Best practices suggest that when communities, schools, and families work together, the results are stronger communities that support the success of young people. The challenges that schools face today in fostering true parental engagement are the result of a multitude of complex issues. In completion of this course, students will have completed an in-depth study of ways schools are successfully meeting the parent-school connection challenge. Students also explore and adapt strategies to create that connection in ways that meet the specific needs of various schools and communities.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).


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    Food Styling (CUL-301)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Culinary Arts and Event Planning

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the history of food styling; demonstrate plating techniques; assess existing businesses to begin the process of developing a client base by use of food styling strategies; assess and choose props for photography; and describe how to work with food for the best results.

    Instruction:
    This course introduces students to the world of food styling, plating, food photography, props, working with sauces. Students learn the requirements and considerations for beginning a food styling business. Students are required to complete projects that include creating and plating food items for a food event. Students are tested through a comprehensive final exam covering topics such as teamwork, media, preparation, photographing, propping and overcoming challenges in food styling.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Event Planning or Hospitality (8/18).


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    Foundations of Education (EDU-501)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    September 2016 – Present.

    Subject Area:
    Education

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the causes of the increased professionalization of teaching in the United States today and the ramifications of this phenomenon; link educational philosophies to applied educational practices; describe the development of American education and the factors that have influenced it, from roots in classical western civilization through the current times; compare and contrast different theories of education, curriculum and instruction, and apply them; apply principles of multicultural education to classroom instruction; identify at-risk behaviors and proper responses to such behaviors; and identify methods that can decrease or remove racial, ethnic or gender gaps in education.

    Instructions:
    Foundations of American Education is a graduate-level course providing a broad study of the philosophical and social foundations of education in the United States. Students become proficient in terminologies, educational theories, practice and legislation relevant to the American educational system. Students link previously developed educational ideas to present practices and compare and contrast the benefits and deficiencies of the applications of these ideas.  After being exposed to this information, students should be able to implement these theories into practice. In addition to taking a final examination on the course content, students are required to write two research papers on assigned topics and must successfully complete both of these assignments in order to receive credit recommendations.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education (9/16).


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    Foundations of Entrepreneurship (BUS-350)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe various important business issues as they relate to new ventures; identify and appreciate the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of an entrepreneur; prepare a coherent business plan; explain the essential steps necessary to create and operate a small business enterprise; and describe the fundamental financial requirements and competencies for small business startups.

    Instruction:
    This course provides students with a basic understanding of how an entrepreneur assumes all the risks and rewards of a venture. Entrepreneurs who prove to be successful in taking on the risks of a startup are rewarded with profits, fame, and continued growth opportunities. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Entrepreneurship, Business Management, Marketing, Management, or Economics (4/19).


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    Foundations of Fashion Styling (FAS-205)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Fashion Merchandising

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: recognize and identify the roles and responsibilities of a fashion stylist before and during a photo shoot; compare and contrast the three primary areas that encompass fashion styling; define industry terms to enhance professional communications as a stylist; identify personality traits and must-have skills of successful stylists; deconstruct an editorial fashion shoot and infer from fashion calendars and magazine timetables how to prepare for a photo shoot; describe the duties of a wardrobe stylist and how the job duties differ from a fashion stylist; apply the basic principles of design and create apparel and non-apparel looks utilizing methods of styling; explain the classifications of personal style; compile a list of potential careers in fashion styling; learn the aspects of building a professional styling portfolio; and develop a business plan for a styling business including how to build a client base and market a styling business.

    Instructions:
    This course introduces students to the role of styling and the business of and career tracks within fashion styling, including their own business or the film and entertainment industry. Major topics include: work and and responsibilities of the fashion stylist and wardrobe stylist, shopping and prepping merchandise, working with models on test shoots or photo shoots, styling professionalism, building a professional portfolio, social media, marketing, professional communications, sources of cultural inspiration and historical references. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the associate/certificate degree category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fashion Merchandising (4/19).


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    Foundations of Sport Education (EDU-260)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Exercise Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: correctly identify the main goals, specific objectives, and main features of sport education; design a complete sport education season template given a particular student population; plan, implement, and assess the outcomes of a full entry-level sport education season taught to students in a school setting; and develop appreciation for teaching sport in a more authentic and complete manner in a school physical education context.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with an introduction to educational methods that are backed by substantial research that supports the idea that sport education is a valuable and motivating approach to delivering quality physical education experiences for students of all ages. Sport education represents a departure from traditional curriculum and instruction models because it takes a practical student-centered approach, providing students with opportunities to take ownership and responsibility for various aspects of their class experiences. This approach better prepares students to be lifelong participants in healthy physical activity, sport, and to be more engaged in class. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Promotion, Wellness, Health Studies, or Physical Education (4/19).


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    Foundations of Stress Management (PSY-310)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: distinguish how stress affects people physically, emotionally, mentally, spiritually, and socially; judge the capacity for handling the demands that are part of today’s world; practice how to prevent stress; discover how to reduce or cope successfully with unavoidable stress; appraise several different measures to assess personal stress; deduce that the body is designed to respond to acute stress predictably for one outcome-survival; evaluate the skills of “managing self-talk”, “stopping negative thoughts”, and “going with the flow” as mental tools to help prevent the activation of the stress response; assess values clarification to facilitate self-understanding; discover how to spend and save money to bring a lifetime of financial freedom; examine personal spiritual health; incorporate the behaviors of proper exercise, eating right, adequate sleep, and avoiding unhealthy behaviors to form a foundation of stress management; probe complementary and alternative therapies to expand roles in stress management and health promotion; formulate a plan that addresses a specific personality and the situations that determine the most effective tools to deal with stress.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with an understanding of stress management and prevention. Using an experiential approach; this course encourages the student to personalize the information through practical applications and stress-reducing resources that includes activities and assessments. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Health Studies, Human Development, or Social Sciences (4/19)


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    Fundamentals of Fitness (FIT-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Exercise Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe what is necessary to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness; evaluate a physically active lifestyle; discuss responsibilities and social behaviors in physical activity settings; contrast differences among people in physical activity settings; describe how physical activity provides opportunities for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interactions; and explain the history, rules, etiquette, origin, and cultural perspectives of a chosen sport.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with knowledge and skills necessary to develop and maintain a health-enhancing level of fitness and to increase physical competence, self-esteem, and the motivation to pursue lifelong physical activity. Students gain an understanding of the components of health-related fitness, training principles, and the benefits of being physically active. Major topics include: wellness, health-related physical fitness, fitness terminology, training principles, components of fitness, fitness assessments, goal setting, benefits of fitness, diet and nutrition, skill related fitness, and prevention and care of injuries related to physical activity. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Wellness, Health Promotion, Exercise Science, Nutrition, or Health Sciences (4/19).


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    Fundamentals of Management (BUS-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    test

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: outline the organizational management structures typical for most organizations; assist in planning and strategic management of organizations; propose methods by which organizational decisions can be made in a variety of circumstances; define and explain the concept of entrepreneurship and specific problems that arise in the course of new venture management; describe issues that typically arise during the process of organizational change and innovation; identify and help solve issues that arise in managing human resources and the behavior of individuals within an organization; propose ideas that would help motivate employees to improve their performance; explain the importance of leadership and influence processes to the performance of organizations; outline the importance of communication in organizations and steps that could be taken to improve the same; and prescribe steps that may be taken to improve the managing of groups and teams, the control process and operations, and quality and productivity.

    Instruction:
    This self-study course examines fundamental management concepts and managerial responsibilities in both formal and informal organizational structures by providing students with a foundation of management principles. Major topics include: planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and staffing. 

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management or Business (9/13).


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    Gerontology (PSY-330)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: investigate sociological and gerontological perspectives on aging; analyze the impact of an “aging” society through data analysis of demographic patterns and historical factors; compare sociological concepts and theories of aging through practical application; appraise cultural awareness of the aging population; evaluate conclusions from aging research through effective oral and written communication; and analyze and evaluate research related to aging.

    Instruction:
    This course provides students with the ability to explore the social aspects of aging and how aging impacts individuals as well as communities, nations, and the world. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Health Studies, Human Development, or Social Sciences (4/19).


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    Group Counseling (PSY-307)
    Location:
    Various, distance learning format.

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced).

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Counseling and Social Work

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: evaluate tools to work in various settings with a variety of client groups; describe the historical and the current use of groups in social work practice; assess and apply group properties and group processes that occur in a group; investigate the basic techniques for work with diversity in groups; compile the elements to plan for, begin, and conduct a group; compare group processes to achieve the goals and objectives of the group; evaluate the outcome of a group and to use the information to improve group practice; and compare resources available to plan for and establish specific treatment and task groups.

    Instruction:
    This course explores the skills necessary for group work practice. It emphasizes basic theory about groups and group process, demonstrates the skills necessary for effective practice and focuses on the practice of these skills. The course also looks at techniques to deal with the challenges of diversity in groups.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Sciences, Social Work, Addiction Counseling, Psychology, Mental Health, or Counseling (8/18).


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    Health and Safety in Early Childhood Education (ECE-303)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Education

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe how basic physical health, mental health, nutrition, and safety needs influence the growth and development of young children and explain how policies support those needs; implement and evaluate research-based basic health, safety, and nutritional practices and enact strategies for encouraging the of practice safe behaviors for students in the classroom and in their communities; explain and identify ways to maintain the health, safety, and wellness of young children including: identifying hazards and risks; conducting regular health and safety assessments consistent with regulations and quality standards; reporting child abuse; and taking corrective action when necessary; identify signs, symptoms, and emergency treatment options of childhood diseases and those which might indicate physical, sexual, and psychological abuse or neglect, and analyze the impact of stress and trauma on children, families, and the broader community; identify and describe first aid procedures, emergency response procedures, recordkeeping, communication processes, and related legal, ethical, and policy issues related to medical services to families and co-workers; explain ways to create culturally responsive, nutrition plans and identify strategies supportive of collaboration with families and health professionals in meeting children’s individual health and nutritional needs; provide examples of effective health and immunization record-keeping systems; recognize, document, and report child maltreatment, and methods for caring for an abused child; explain the importance that stable, responsive, and consistent caregiving and good communication has on providing children with an optimum environment for good mental health; identify and describe culturally responsive strategies for engaging with families and communities to preserve the health, safety, and wellness of young children.

    Instruction:
    This course is designed to provide early childhood educators with the knowledge and skills needed to engage in developmentally appropriate practices in health promotion, wellness, and safety for young children from diverse backgrounds and abilities levels within the context of the school, family, and community. Topics include: physical and mental health, nutrition, safety, communication, and record-keeping.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Children’s Health, Children’s Safety, or Children’s Mental Health (8/18).


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    History and Systems of Psychology ( Formerly History and Systems of Psychology (PSY-202) ) (PSY-304)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe how psychology’s history is studied, its philosophical influences, its physiological influences, and the contributions of its founders; explain the theoretical tenets and empirical methods of structuralism, functionalism and applied psychology; investigate the theory and methods used in Behaviorism and Gestalt Psychology;discuss the contributions of psychoanalytic and humanistic theory and method, and the contemporary developments in psychology;and evaluate the relative merits of psychology’s major schools of thought and key studies in the history of psychology.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course explores the history of psychology and major schools of thought. From the Greek philosophers to the contributions of modern schools of thought such as evolutionary psychology, students explore important theoretical and methodological movements in psychology such as structuralism, functionalism, applied psychology, behaviorism, and psychoanalysis. Students evaluate the relative merits of each of psychology’s approaches and deepen their knowledge of game-changing studies in the field. The unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major, version 2.0, August, 2013.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education (12/14).


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    Human Growth and Development ( Formerly (PSY-301) ) (PSY-203)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe developmental psychology’s theoretical perspectives and research methods, genetic and environmental influences on development, development in the womb, the birth process, and the characteristics of newborns; analyze research and theory regarding cognitive, emotional, and social childhood development; interpret research and theory regarding cognitive, emotional and social development in adolescence and early adulthood; investigate research and theory regarding cognitive, emotional, and social development in middle and late adulthood.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course explores how humans develop cognitively, emotionally, and socially as they age. From prenatal development through infancy, childhood, and adulthood, cognitive, moral, physical, emotional, and social development are discussed. The foundations of the discipline and its research methods are also explored. The unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major, version 2.0, August, 2013.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science or Teacher Education (12/14).


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    Human Resources Management (BUS-202)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss the historical and present day importance of Human Resources Management (HRM) and its related subcategories; utilize, identify, and describe the theories of HRM and apply theories to practical organizational occurrences; identify and demonstrate appropriate HRM terminology when discussing the discipline; critically analyze the importance of micro, meso, and macro level job analysis; convey the importance of HRM compliance in relationship to laws, regulations, and diversity; compare and contrast the importance of training and development; explain and conceptualize the components associated with compensation and benefits; and apply legal knowledge related to organizational governance to “real world” situations.

    Instruction:
    This course provides students with an introductory overview of the topic of Human Resource Management (HRM) and focuses on the study of various components supporting strategic functionality of an organization. Throughout this course, an array of topics related to HRM are explored. Such topics include, but are not limited to: the law, governance, and employee rights, organizational diversity, staffing, employee development, compensation and benefits, international HRM. This course begins with an introduction to the historical and present-day role of HRM, including relevant vocabulary used in the field. Once a foundational knowledge is attained, students begin to explore the role that subtopics of the discipline play in an organization’s success.&

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resource Management, Management, Operations Management, Business Communications, or Entrepreneurship (8/18).


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    Inclusion: Effective Practices for all Students (ECE-355)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Education

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define inclusive education and its importance as an educational practice; critically analyze the foundations of inclusive education its historical trends, current practices, and emerging challenges; compare and contrast various special learning needs and how those needs influence instructional strategies employed by the teacher; explain how collaboration and teaming can be used to more effectively implement best practices in inclusive education; and describe the critical factors associated with creating a classroom environment that facilitates effective content area instruction, behavior management, and assessment of student learning.

    Instruction:
    This course teaches participants how to create an inclusive learning environment that meets the needs of all learners. Course participants develop an understanding of current best practices, historical trends, and emerging challenges related to educating students with diverse learning needs. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to engage course participants in critical thought in order to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are necessary for the participant to meet the needs of all learners in their classrooms. Students gain a deeper understanding of the foundations of inclusion and the elements of effective inclusive education and explore the importance of curricula and proper assessment strategies in meeting the individualized needs of students with diverse learning needs.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Music and Movement (8/18).


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    Information Literacy (ENG-103)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    English

    Number of Credits:
    2

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define information literacy; outline specific skills required for someone to be informational-literate in current society; assess the importance of knowing how to access, evaluate, and utilize information in an academic or work environment; explain challenges faced by non-literate people; develop key and relevant research questions; distinguish between primary and secondary information sources and reliable and non-reliable sources; note the various ways to access information; use library resources to gather information; evaluate information from a variety of sources; access relevant information electronically; identify criteria necessary when evaluating information gleaned from the internet; select appropriate methods to organize information for maximum utility and future reference; list methods to organize verbal and visual information;explain the importance of privacy and security and how they can become endangered and protected in certain environments; define various intellectual property rights that protect information; and engage in appropriate electronic discussions and presentations.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course requires students to complete approximately six reading assignments and pass a final exam. Major topics include: information literacy in the modern world and defining the need for information as it relates to the research paper; evaluating authority; organizing information; and legal, ethical, and communication issues.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in English or Literature (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Intermediate Modern Hebrew (HEB-201)
    Location:
    This exam is NOT available to take online. We have two different versions 3 credit and 8 credit exams. Please contact us if you are interested in taking the exam at one of our location testing sites.

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Language

    Number of Credits:
    3

    This exam is NOT available to take online. We have two different versions 3 credit and 8 credit exams. Please contact us if you are interested in taking the exam at one of our location testing sites.
    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: learn to comprehend common phrases and questions and respond appropriately; read and understand more advanced texts and answer questions in Hebrew; translate from spoken or written Hebrew into English; translate from English into Hebrew; and conjugate verbs and decline adjectives appropriately for the context.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with the ability to develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Modern Hebrew, as well as gain exposure to modern Israeli culture. Second year Hebrew introduces two new verbal conjugation patterns, past tense conjugations for all verbal types, how to express possession, continued work on the construct state, and higher-level texts, syntax, and vocabulary. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Intermediate Hebrew (4/19).


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    International Business (BUS-201)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    Version 1: September 2013 - July 2018. Version 2: August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify national differences in politics and culture; illustrate the effects of ethics on international business; explain international trade theory; describe the political economy of international business; outline the effect of foreign direct investment; discuss examples of regional economic integration; demonstrate how the foreign exchange markets work; identify and explain the roles of the international monetary system and global capital markets; show various strategies and organizational structures in international businesses; identify and choose the appropriate entry strategy and necessary strategic alliances given a fact set; lay out the details and differences between exporting, importing, and counter trade; show how global production, outsourcing, and logistics affect the international marketplace; explain how cultural and national differences affect global marketing and Research and Development; and account for international business using various countries as stakeholders.

    :
    Version 1 and 2: This self-study course provides an introduction to International Business and explores pros and cons of economic theories, government policies, business strategies and organizational structures in the global business world. Emphasis focuses on differences in economies, differing ethical issues facing today’s executives and how politics play a large role in international commerce. Students learn about global trade and investment strategy with particular importance placed on the global monetary system, the strategy and structure of the international business environment while exploring the actual operational practices, managerial implications of each topic on the actual practice of international business, and the opportunities and risks associated with conducting business on a global basis.

    Recommendation:
    Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in International Business or Business (9/13). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in International Business or Business (8/18 revalidation).


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    International Foods (HOS-202)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Culinary Arts and Event Planning

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: prepare foods from several of the countries being studied using ingredients indigenous to these countries; practice with an array of foods that might be used for events; practice proper food handling and sanitation; and practice proper food handling and sanitation as stated in the National Restaurant Association’s Educational Foundation’s manual, ServSafe.

    Instruction:
    The course focuses on concepts and techniques of food preparation used in various countries and cultures around the world. Students plan and prepare complete menus and study standard menu terminology from different countries. Management skills and proper equipment use are stressed. Students gain competence in professional supervision of food production and service. Students must complete projects in preparing full internationally inspired meals and complete comprehensive final exams.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Advanced Culinary Arts or International Cuisines (8/18).


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    Introduction to Baking (CUL-102)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Culinary Arts and Event Planning

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: describe the various aspects of baking as a profession; describe and practice proper sanitation and food handling; Identify ingredients such as flours, sugars, and leavening agents; Identify basic baking equipment; recognize and select proper flavoring agents such as extracts and oils; distinguish between heat sources such as convection and standard ovens; identify baking and pastry trends; and describe the various techniques necessary to create quality baked goods.

    Instructions:
    This exam introduces students to all the necessary techniques to successfully bake quick breads, muffins, yeast breads, cakes, cupcakes, brownies and other baked goods. It is an overview of the field of baking and pastry arts and is designed to introduce students to the basics of using ingredients to create baked goods for consumption both personally and professionally. The knowledge and skills necessary to operate a bakery are discussed. Other topics include: explore food safety and sanitation, pastry and bread origins, menus, recipe and measurement conversions and cost control.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours as Introductory Baking for a culinary/hospitality certificate or associate degree program (6/17).


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    Introduction to Chemistry (SCI-105)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    November 2015 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: perform mathematical functions and conduct measurements and calculations that are necessary for the study and use of chemistry, including problem solving and the usage of appropriate units; identify the distinctions between matter and energy and the relationship between them; distinguish between elements, compounds and mixtures (heterogeneous and homogeneous) and describe the relationships between them; utilize the periodic table and the various pieces of information available thereon; describe the components of an atomic nucleus and relate those concepts to radioactivity and nuclear energy; balance chemical equations between various reactants; identify the special properties of various solids, liquids, gasses and solutions; determine the effects of various factors such as heat, moisture and other factors on chemical reactions and the rates at which they occur; distinguish between acids and bases and identify their varying roles in nature and in industry; and describe various types of organic compounds and identify their roles in life on Earth.

    Instruction:
    Introduction to Chemistry covers a variety of subjects that relate to the study of matter. The course deals with the impact of chemistry on daily lives. It focuses on the relationship of matter and energy and the structure of subatomic particles, atoms and molecules, which are the building blocks of matter. The course also focuses on compounds, bonds and chemical reactions and the characteristics of various types of molecules, such as acids, bases and organic compounds. Because it is anticipated that most Coopersmith students taking this course are doing so as part of preparation for a career in a healthcare-related field, the course has been designed to focus on knowledge and skills necessary for those entering health-related careers. The course uses a self-study format and asks students to prepare for the proficiency exam by completing a course of study that includes reading assignments and video assignments as presented in the course syllabus.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in general science or chemistry (11/15).


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    Introduction to Coaching (PSY-105)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: discover coaching and the coaching process; analyze listening skills to encourage thinking; examine how questions, paraphrasing and summarizing can provide clarity to the coaches; investigate the conversational framework of the coaching process; practice tools and techniques that are the foundation of the coaching conversation; analyze how body language is used in the coaching conversation; compare different activities related to talking, drawing and playing to increase the effectiveness of the coaching session; determine the elements of the concept a “coaching way of being;” and construct a coaching contract and ethical statement.

    Instruction:
    This course provides students with coaching resources. The step-by-step style allows students to see the process and techniques to gain the critical skills needed to become a successful coach. Real-life coaching sessions provide examples to read and activities to complete to increase students’ skill levels. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the certificate/associate degree category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Human Development, Health and Sports Studies, or Educational Studies (4/19).


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    Introduction to Computers (CIS-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Computers and Information Technology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: describe the function and purpose of computer hardware components and important application software; evaluate major operating systems; illustrate the major telecommunications alternatives and evaluate their suitability for a given task; compare and contrast Local Area Networks and Wide Area Networks; propose and evaluate solutions to data communication problems; and distinguish between the important programming languages and choose the correct computer language for the specific job.

    Instructions:
    Introduction to Computers (CIS-101) introduces students to the principles of information processing and computers. Students differentiate between the concepts of hardware and software and their uses in information systems. The exam traces the development of computers from their historical background to modern times and the role computers have in modern society. Special focus is given to computer operations and systems, as well as terminology.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate /associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Information Systems or Information Technology (6/17).


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    Introduction to Computing and Program Design (TCH-120)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Computers and Information Technology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain how data is represented in a computer; demonstrate knowledge of computer hardware and software; demonstrate knowledge of computer networks; design, implement and execute algorithms; explain social, ethical and legal issues arising from the use of computers; discuss future uses of computers; discuss computer usage in interdisciplinary fields; demonstrate knowledge of software applications such as electronic spreadsheets and databases; use a web browser to search the Internet; use computer terminology in written documents and oral communication; use computer etiquette in electronic communications; and use communication tools effectively.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course provides a broad introduction to the use of computers as tools for creativity, communications, organizing information, and problem-solving. The basic concepts of computer hardware, software, networking, and the Internet are covered. Organization of a typical Personal Computer (PC) is examined in a given popular operating systems environment. Terminology and concepts related to major PC hardware components and their functions are discussed consistent with industry standards and practices. Some typical user interface of popular operating systems are introduced. Topics include: current state, trends, and challenges of various aspects of computing: computer hardware and software, and programming languages.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Design (12/14).


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    Introduction to Early Childhood Education (ECE-210)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Education

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: describe and distinguish between the theories that influence early childhood programs and various philosophies of early childhood education; define early childhood education the professional behaviors that are associated with early childhood education; demonstrate understanding of early learning theories, program models and developmentally appropriate practices; and develop strategies for communicating and collaborating with families.

    <>Instructions:
    This exam explores the many aspects of the profession of early childhood education, focusing on developmentally appropriate practices, types of programs, historical perspectives, ethics, current issues, and what it means to be a professional. The exam focuses on the ever-changing aspects of early childhood education, and how this creates both challenges and opportunities to overcome and explore on the students’ journeys in the profession of early childhood education.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).


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    Introduction to Fashion Merchandising (FAS-301)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Fashion Merchandising

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the nature of fashion; define and use basic vocabulary of the fashion industry; list and articulate each level of the industry and summarize how each level fits into the industry; recognize and give examples of the basic principles relating to fashion, its movement and influences including sociological, economic, psychological and environmental; discuss some of the historical development of apparel fashions; recognize specific segments within the fashion industry and describe how merchandising differs from sector to sector; identify and classify different forms of in-store and non-store retailing, their appropriate use, advantages and disadvantages; articulate the role the fashion industry plays in the global society; locate the significant and supporting domestic fashion centers in the United States and abroad and the varying roles they play in the apparel industry; identify and describe potential careers in each segment of the fashion industry; and describe the various types of retail distributors and fashion support services and explain how they service the merchants of fashion.

    Instructions:
    This course provides exposure to the terminology, activities, and operations that make up the apparel and non-apparel fashion industry and the forces, people, and environments who influence it. Major topics include: historical and contemporary influences on fashion, an overview of the levels in the industry, including raw materials, product development, retailing, and ancillary services, motivations of dress, theories of fashion adoption, and the fashion life cycle, fashion statements and forecast fashion trends, international and domestic fashion markets, how fashion is conceived, marketed, and sold. Career possibilities are presented for varying segments of the industry. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Fashion Business or Fashion Merchandising (4/19).


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    Introduction to HTML5 and CSS3 (TCH-105)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    January 2015 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Computers and Information Technology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: develop client side web pages using HTML5 and CSS3 source code that is both readable and upholds current standards; create basic HTML elements such as hyperlinks, images, tables, and forms; use latest web technologies and programming languages to structure a web page effectively; control display and formatting characteristics for web page designs using Cascading Style Sheets; demonstrate knowledge of box properties and external style sheets to build portable, accessible, responsive web sites that present information with clarity and appeal; and compare and contrast user interactions between desktop web, mobile application, and mobile web.

    Instructions:
    Introduction to HTML5 and CSS3 is a self-study course introduces students to the principles of creating a web site from scratch using HTML5 (the latest HTML standard) and CSS3, (the latest CSS standard). This course leads students through the entire web site creation process, while developing and enhancing HTML, CSS, and visual design skills along the way. Students learn how to create accessible web sites that allow users to easily and quickly navigate through information, regardless of browser type, connection speed, or browsing device. Students also explore the principles of responsive design, a new method of designing web sites that adapt to devices ranging from mobile phones to desktop monitors. Whether building a site from scratch or redesigning an existing site, the principles presented in this course help students deliver their web content in a more responsive, accessible, and visually exciting way. Specifically, with HTML5 it is possible to develop web pages entirely with HTML5 and CSS3. There is no need for “plug‐ins” to provide additional functionality. The course of study is necessary to be prepared for the final examination, which consists of reading, study guide and crash course video supplements.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Design, Web Programming, or Internet Programming (1/15).


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    Introduction to Life Processes (SCI-102)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    Version 1: May 2014 - July 2018. Version 2: August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the roles of the major types of biological molecules in forming living organisms and carrying out life processes; apply the roles of each of the parts of a cell to the life processes that they carry out; analyze the manner in which substances that help determine genetic inheritance, including chromosomes, DNA, nucleotides, etc., impact the genetic characteristics of offspring; apply the various life processes carried out by human organs and organ systems to the over-all goal of maintaining homeostasis in human beings; and evaluate the impacts that various interferences with homeostasis may have on the functioning of the human body and identify the steps that the human body takes to deal with such interference.

    Instructions:
    Version 1 and 2: This self-study course explores the study of the life processes of all organisms and the life processes of human beings. It begins with some necessary background information about molecular and cellular structure and then moves into life processes, including nutrition, respiration, circulation, excretion and regulation and the maintenance of homeostasis, specifically in human beings.

    Credit Recommendation:
    Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or as a core science requirement (5/14). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or as a core science requirement (8/18 revalidation).


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    Introduction to Marketing (BUS-102)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    September 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the importance of managing profitable customer relationships; identify steps  important in partnering to build customer relationships; assist in managing marketing relationships; read and interpret trends in consumer and business buying behavior from given statistics; define segmentation, targeting, and positioning and explain their importance in marketing; assist in the construction of product, services, and branding strategy; determine the relevant factors to be considered during new product development; identify pricing considerations and strategies important in marketing products; assist in determining which marketing channels are likely to be effective in marketing a given product under a specific scenario; help manage advertising, sales promotion, and public relations; and describe and define key features that exist in marketing over the internet and marketing through other media.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course examines fundamental principles, problems, and practices of marketing by providing students with a foundation of marketing principles including product, price, placement, and promotion. Special focus is on the functions of marketing and the relationship to the production and distribution of goods and services that are ultimately purchased by the consumer.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Marketing or Business (9/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Introduction to Psychology (PSY-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify key concepts, models, and principles regarding psychological research methods, human biology, consciousness, development and human diversity, and sensation and perception; demonstrate knowledge and apply the concepts of basic learning, memory, cognition, language, and intelligence concepts, structures, and processes; and explain key theories and research findings regarding emotions, stress, personality, and psychological disorders.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of psychology and explores, through a psychological lens, theory and research related to neurological, biological, cognitive, sociological, cultural, and developmental phenomena. Other topics include: theoretical and empirical perspectives on personality and psychological disorders. The unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major (version 2.0, August, 2013).

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education (12/14).


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    Introduction to Public Speaking (COM-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    English

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Instructions:
    This self-study course provides an overview of public speaking techniques, goals, and procedures. The course begins with a discussion of presentation of speeches in general and ways to encourage maximum audience attentiveness. Other topics are: researching speeches and planning presentations to ensure maximum effectiveness, writing and organizing speeches, persuading and informing audiences, and adapting speeches depending on the event, environment, and audience.Students are required to deliver four oral speeches of varying lengths on assigned topics as described in the course syllabus and successfully pass a final examination to earn credit recommendations for this course.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communications (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Introduction to Sociology (SOC-103)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    September 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Sociology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the history of Sociology as a field; identify the manner in which sociological research is conducted; consider ethical and social ramifications when conducting sociological research; define culture and diversity and relate those two concepts to each other; determine the interaction between human nature and socialization and the effect that they have on one another in various contexts; characterize societal institutions on the macro and micro levels; ascertain the role of technology on society and human interaction; detail the effects of mass media on socialization; identify the roles of social groups and organizations on human society and interaction; and analyze the role of deviance from societal norms on society and discuss the social control of deviant behavior that is exercised by society.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course in Sociology is designed for students with no prior background in the subject and guides students through the process of asking and answering important questions from a sociological perspective. Students exercise critical thinking, reading, and writing skills while being exposed to sociological theories and research they can apply to important social issues. Students learn how individuals are organized into social groups from intimate groups to bureaucracies and how these influence individual behavior, considering the nature and interrelationships of basic social institutions such as family, education, religion, and the economy.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology (9/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Introduction to Statistics (MAT-102)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Mathematics

    Number of Credits:
    4

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: classify collected data to ensure efficient statistical analysis; graph data on various types of charts and graphs to display distribution tendency, variation, etc; determine the probability of the occurrence of an event based on a variety of data types; apply conditional probability rules, including the addition rule; use probability distributions to model the number of successes in various sample sizes; calculate standard distributions and confidence intervals for sets of data; use statistical analyses to test hypotheses for small and large samples; and perform basic regression analyses.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course provides students with a working knowledge of the most important basic concepts of probability and statistics by teaching methods of how data is sorted, characterized, visualized, and interpreted. Students discuss important probability concepts such as events, sample spaces, conditional probability, and effects of multiple variables. Other topics include: statistical distribution, sample sizes, testing, regression analysis and complex statistical analysis.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Statistics or Mathematics (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Introductory Modern Hebrew (HEB-101)
    Location:
    This exam is NOT available to take online. Please contact us if you are interested in taking the exam at one of our location testing sites.

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Language

    Number of Credits:
    4

    This exam is NOT available to take online. Please contact us if you are interested in taking the exam at one of our location testing sites.
    We do have an option to take a Hebrew Exam for more credits. Please speak to an advisor to discuss this.

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: comprehend common phrases and questions and respond appropriately; read and understand more advanced texts and answer questions in Hebrew; translate from spoken or written Hebrew into English and translate from English into Hebrew; identify the Hebrew alphabet and vowel system; identify parts of speech (nouns, verbs, adjectives, prepositions, etc.); and conjugate verbs and decline adjectives appropriately for the context.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with an introduction to the basic structures and vocabulary of Modern Hebrew. Students develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Modern Hebrew, and gain some exposure to modern Israeli culture. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Introductory Hebrew, Modern Hebrew, or Modern Foreign Language (4/19).


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    Jewish Art of Antiquity (ART-301)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Art and Music

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: identify artistic motivations of Jewish art of Antiquity; describe the key features of  Jewish art of Antiquity; trace the development of popular motifs in Jewish art; compare and contrast Jewish art of Antiquity from different places; compare and contrast Jewish art of Late Antiquity with that of nearby cultures; identify strengths and weaknesses of various theories of art interpretation as they apply to Jewish art of Antiquity; explain changes in Jewish art from the Second Temple period through the end of Late Antiquity; analyze Jewish art of Antiquity from multiple perspectives, including political, social, and religious; and apply rabbinic sources to questions of Jewish art.

    Instruction:
    Jewish Art of Antiquity examines visual Judaism from the time of the settlement of the Jewish people in the Land of Israel, including major emphasis on Late Antiquity. This includes knowledge of the major archaeological finds from that period in both Israel and the Diaspora, and what makes each significant. The exam presents a variety of interpretations of these pieces and analyzes the debates over various theories of interpretation. Social, political, and religious contexts are examined to better understand the meaning of the art. Comparisons are made between different works from the period. Special attention is given to the rabbinic view on art and specific types of art, and what level of influence the rabbis may have had over the producers of the art in this period.

    <strong”>Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Art, Biblical Studies, History, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religious Studies (6/17).


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    Jewish Clothing in History, Society, and Thought (SOC-305)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Sociology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: trace the historical development of Jewish dress from its sources to current practice; identify historical articles of clothing for their significance in the wearer’s life and in historical context; counsel someone who is interested in assembling authentic style accoutrements of a Jewish wardrobe for a specific ethnic group from a certain time; identify symbolism used on Jewish clothing and its significance; explain how external decrees helped shape the Jewish wardrobe historically and continue to leave lingering effects today; describe the standards of modesty suggested by current Orthodox Jewish authorities and the reasons behind them; define what Orthodox Jews mean by “Jewish” clothing and how it relates to clothing worn by Jews throughout history; and connect clothing practices across different Jewish cultures to shared underlying concepts.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with an understanding of the development and identity of clothing of the Jewish people, beginning with the Biblical commands that involve clothing and many of the references to dress in the Bible and what they signify. Major topics include: the history of clothing used by Jews for special life-cycle events along with social explanations for these practices, the history of governmental decrees on Jewish apparel, both for Jews living under the Muslims and the Christians, the history of uniquely Jewish fashion, split between the Sephardic and the Ashkenazic lands. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology or Judaic Studies (4/19).


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    Jewish Participation in the Garment Industry (HIS-302)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    History and Political Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: trace the historical development of the Jewish presence in the garment industry in the United States, England, and Germany; compare and contrast the development of the Jewish garment industry in the United States and England and explain reasons for the differences; identify challenges that Jews faced in the garment industry; discuss the role of societal attitudes towards fashion in the development of the Jews in the garment industry; describe the role of anti-Semitism in the Jewish relationship with the garment industry in the United States, England, and Germany; differentiate between the garment industry in New York as compared to smaller centers like Rochester, and between the growth of the mens wear and womens wear industries; connect major historical events to the development of the position of Jews in the garment industry; and identify reasons given for the economic success of Jewish immigrants in the United States and what this means to other immigrant groups.

    Instructions:
    This course examines the role of Jews in the garment and fashion industries, from simple laborers to manufacturers and department store owners and designers. The course focuses mainly on Jewish immigrants to the United States and their role in the garment industry from approximately 1840-1950. Major topics include: the Jewish role in the garment industry in England and Germany during a similar time frame; the development of the garment industry in New York and how that compares and contrasts to smaller centers such as Rochester and Cincinnati; consequences of significant historical events, such as the Gold Rush, the Civil War, the Progressive Era, and World War II, the impact of anti-Semitism, culminating with the Nazi destruction of the German fashion industry, justification to explain Jewish success in the garment industry and how it affected immigrant economic progress. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History, Jewish History, Judaic Studies, Sociology, or Anthropology (4/19).


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    Jewish Rabbinical Counseling (PSY-308)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply best practices and strategies of pastoral counseling; identify various mental health care professionals, their expertise and how each could help a counselee; comfort the ill and bereaved in an effective and sensitive manner; counsel children and adults who have undergone recent trauma; identify potential addictions and abuse and pursue the proper steps to recovery; describe a variety of mental illnesses and the proper handling of patients suffering from them; help prepare people for marriage; and make counseling decisions based on an awareness of confidentiality laws.

    Instruction:
    This course examines rabbinical counseling practices and descriptions of typical mental health issues that may be encountered and the various professionals and services available for referral, including premarital counseling, dealing with couples in distress and spousal abuse and caring for the sick, the dying, and the bereaved. Special focus is given to dealing with suicide and survivors of crises as well as children in matters of crisis and death. Although many of the sources speak to the role of the communal rabbi or chaplain, many of the skills are equally applicable to other spiritual counselors, teachers and mentors.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Psychology, Sociology, Counseling, or Rabbinics (8/18).


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    Kinesiology ( Formerly Kinesiology (SCI-301) ) (SCI-221)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    January 2015 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Exercise Science

    Number of Credits:
    1

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify all the bones of the human body and their anatomical landmarks; describe the roles of the ligaments that attach the bones and form the major joints of the human body in human locomotion and movement; identify the major muscles of the human body that cross the joints; describe the fundamental movements created in the human body’s joints by the muscles that cross the joints; and determine the effect of muscular and skeletal movement on the major blood vessels and the major nerves of the human body.

    Instruction:
    This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. This course is designed to introduce the structures of human anatomy and explain how these structures are involved in human movement. Numerous illustrations and optional opportunities for are provided to enhance the learning of human anatomy.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the associate/certificate degree category, 1 semester hour in Personal Training (1/15).


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    Linear Algebra (MAT-305)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Mathematics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: solve systems of linear equations and perform operations on vectors; determine if a given set of vectors is linearly independent and perform linear transformations; determine if the inverse of a matrix exists, calculate the inverse of a matrix, and identify geometric changes of matrices; determine if a vector is in a vector space, identify properties of determinants, and apply Cramer’s rule to solve linear systems; determine whether a given set is a vector space or subspace, find a basis for a column space, and map a vector to its coordinate vector in a basis; find the dimension of a subspace, apply the rank theorem, and map a coordinate vector from one base to another; calculate eigenvalues, determine if a vector is an eigenvector, and diagonalize matrices; determine orthogonality projections and orthogonality of vectors; determine symmetry and orthogonality of matrices, find the matrix of a quadratic form; and find the singular values of a matrix.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with a working knowledge of the concepts in linear algebra and the underlying theory and applications in linear algebra.Topics include: linear systems, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, orthogonality, symmetric matrices, and quadratic forms. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting, Business, Computer Science, Data Sciences, Engineering, Economics, Finance, Marketing, or Mathematics (4/19).


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    Literacy Development (ECE-320)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Education

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: describe the foundations of reading and writing processes; use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing and a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading and writing; engage students in literacy practices that develop awareness, understanding and respect for differences in their societies; create an environment that fosters development of reading and writing skills; and pursue the development of professional skills that enable students to effectively work with colleagues.

    Instructions:
    The purpose of this exam is to enable new and veteran teachers to construct the knowledge, basic competencies, and dispositions needed to the reading and writing abilities of students in grades Pre-K to 8. Students explore the major approaches and techniques for developing literacy that research and practice have proven successful as well as the theory behind the methods to assist new and veteran teachers to choose, adapt, and/or construct those approaches and techniques that best fit their styles and teaching situations.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).


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    Macroeconomics (ECO-102)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2016 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss major macroeconomic issues of growth, unemployment and inflation; identify and measure economic growth, define, measure, and compare GDP; follow unemployment data via the business cycle; describe the effects of aggregate demand and aggregate supply fluctuations in relation to macroeconomic equilibrium; compare and contrast varied macroeconomics models, including the classic growth, neoclassical, and new growth theories; identify and discuss the underlying causes of inflation and describe the effects of demand-pull and cost-push inflation; use the Philips curve to describe the relationship between inflation and unemployment in the short and long run; identify and discuss the role of the Federal Reserve Bank and monetary policy; and discuss the impacts of governmental budgets and fiscal policy and taxes on saving and investment.

    Instructions:
    This is an introductory course in Macroeconomics for students with no prior background in Economics. The instructional approach is mainly non-quantitative, but graphical analysis is covered. Students learn basic macroeconomic concepts on the aggregate demand and aggregate supply of outputs in the general economy, economic growth and unemployment, and the role of money and banking institutions in affecting the economy’s price level and inflation. Students study various fiscal and monetary policies used by the government to stabilize economic fluctuations. The analytical tools learned in this course are useful in understanding and examining many real world economic problems affecting the general economy. Instruction is offered in the form of a course syllabus and study guide, an assigned textbook with reading assignments, a PowerPoint study guide and provided audio/visual presentations. Students are expected to complete the course of study set forth in the syllabus to properly prepare for the final examination. Some background in college algebra and/or statistics is required. Prerequisite: Some background in college algebra and/or statistics is required.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Marketing, Finance, Economics, Human Resources, or as a general elective (6/16).


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    Management Information Systems (BUS-203)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, sstudents will be able to: identify the organization of information systems in general and their roles of the modern organization in a web-based environment; describe how businesses generally use information systems; assist in the management of both data and knowledge in managing an organization; describe the infrastructure of the information technology system; discuss the roles of e-businesses and e-commerce in today’s business environment; determine the extent to which wireless and mobile computing must be taken into account when managing an organization’s delivery of information over the internet; explain the method by which information systems can be acquired and applied; and manage information systems in a manner that takes into account ethical and social issues; especially those unique to the information age.

    Instruction:
    This exam is an introduction to Information Technology and its applications to the business world. Students explore issues with conducting business in a web-based environment and how to achieve a competitive advantage with a successful digital information system. Emphasis is on information technology infrastructure with additional focus on wireless and mobile computing. Students explore the building and management of systems, from both the organizational and managerial perspective. The exam is designed to provide students with a strong understanding of information systems and the enormous importance they hold in today’s business world.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate /associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management Information Systems (6/17).


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    Managerial Accounting (ACC-215)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the concepts of managerial accounting; summarize control, systems, cost management, and cost behavior; compare traditional and activity-based cost management systems; define organizational design, responsibility centers, and financial control; explain how management accounting information is used for activity and process; and prepare management recommendations for short-term business and capital investment decisions.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting and examines the principles, techniques, and uses of accounting in the planning and control of business organizations from a management perspective. Major topics include: the budgetary process and related performance evaluation techniques, cost-volume-profit relationships, product costing methods, just-in-time (JIT) manufacturing, and activity-based costing (ABC). Related theory and application are reviewed. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting, Business, Data Sciences, Economics, Finance, Marketing Human Resource Management (4/19).


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    Medical Terminology (SCI-211)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Allied Health

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learners Outcome:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: recognize that medical terminology has both constructed and non-constructed terms; identify each of the three word parts (word roots, prefixes, and suffixes) used to construct medical terms; identify, define and spell prefixes and suffixes often used in medical terminology; define and spell the word parts used to create terms for the human body and identify the building blocks; organ systems, and cavities of the human body; describe anatomical planes, regions, and directional terms used to describe areas of the body; comprehend the five major diagnostic imaging techniques; define the word parts used to create medical terms of the integumentary system, musculoskeletal, lymphatic, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, nervous, endocrine and reproductive systems, and special senses; breakdown and define common medical terms used for symptoms, diseases, disorders, procedures, treatments and devices associated with these organ systems and special senses; and build medical terms, pronounce and spell common medical terms associated with these organ and special sensory systems.

    Instructions:
    Medical Terminology teaches students the accepted language of healthcare and emphasizes the medical terms used most commonly by medical providers to allow students who wish to go into the healthcare field an easier transition to the field.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Medical Billing and Coding, Medical Administrative Assisting, Medical Assisting, or Medical Transcriptionist (6/17).


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    Medieval Hispano-Jewish Poetry (LIT-401)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    English

    Number of Credits:
    4

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze and synthesize works of Medieval Jewish poets from Spain, including cultural background and background of Jewish poetry; define common poetic tools, styles, and features; identify styles of major poets and their key works and accomplishments; and become well-versed in various genres of piyut and how and when they are used.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course provides background on the great poetry of the Jews of Medieval Spain, background on the history of Jewish poetry and Jewish settlements and culture in Spain with special emphasis on the piyut (liturgical poem) as developed by the Spanish poets that still exist today.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division associate/baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religion, Medieval Literature, Poetry, Sociology, or as General Elective (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Microeconomics (ECO-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2016 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the concept of scarcity and determine why people consider opportunity costs; describe the laws of supply and demand, pricing systems and be able to calculate price elasticity; identify the central elements of the theory of public choice; discuss the differences between long-term and short-term economic choices; compare multiple forms of competition, including monopolies, oligopolies, and perfect competition; discuss the role the government plays in the economy; demonstrate knowledge of influencing factors in microeconomics, including income differences and health care; define “externalities” and discuss how they affect economic and social decision-making.

    Instructions:
    This is an introductory course in microeconomics for students who have no prior background in economics. The instructional approach is mainly non-quantitative, but graphical analysis is covered. Students learn the basic concepts on the demand and supply of goods, the economic behaviors of households and firms and their interactions, and market structures. Students study situations where a competitive market fails to function efficiently and the ways to deal with them. At the end of the course, students should have acquired basic analytical tools useful for a variety of economic problems in our daily lives. Instruction is offered in the form of a course syllabus and study guide, an assigned textbook with reading assignments, a PowerPoint study guide and provided audio/visual presentations. Students are expected to complete the course of study set forth in the syllabus to properly prepare for the final examination. Some background in college algebra and/or statistics is required.

    Prerequisites:
    Some background in college algebra and/or statistics is required.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Marketing, Finance, Economics, Human Resources, or as a general elective (6/16).


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    Microsoft Access (TCH-164)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    July 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Computers and Information Technology

    Number of Credits:
    2

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: create Access databases and populate them to relevant data; query databases by various criteria and create forms for queries; perform basic calculations and statistics within queries; maintain Access databases by updating records, filtering records, setting validation rules, changing the appearance of data sheets and making mass changes within databases; create reports and forms generated from information in Access databases; generate multi-table forms and manipulate these forms using various techniques; utilize advanced Access reporting techniques to manipulate Access reports and forms in a variety of ways; use Structured Query Language (SQL) to manage data relating to Access databases in a variety of ways.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course covers functions and features of Microsoft Access 2010. Students study database concepts and the Access environment and learn how to design and create databases. Major topics include: tables, fields, and records, sorting and filtering data, setting field properties and data entry rules, creating queries, forms, and reports.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Microsoft Excel (TCH-163)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    July 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Computers and Information Technology

    Number of Credits:
    2

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: create worksheets and present them in different ways showing various fonts, styles, sizes, colors, etc.; use the power of Excel to automatically calculate mathematical data and apply it seamlessly to spreadsheets; copy cells and ranges of cells and perform other complex manipulations of spreadsheets, including adding charts, subtables, etc.; perform financial functions and data tables to produce amortization schedules and use Excel’s formula checking function to minimize the possibility of error; create, sort, and query tables and the data within them; work with multiple worksheets and separate workbooks; and create templates by working with other features such as art, images, and screenshots to work these features into an Excel spreadsheet.

    Instructions:
    This self-study comprehensive course covers all the functions and features of Excel 2010 for students of any skill level. Major topics include: introduction to spreadsheet terminology, Excel’s components, entering and editing text, values, formulas, and pictures, absolute and relative references, ranges, rows, and columns, advanced formatting options, lookup functions, data validation, database functions, and using simple and complex formulas to assist with calculations.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Microsoft PowerPoint (TCH-162)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    July 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Computers and Information Technology

    Number of Credits:
    2

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: create and edit PowerPoint presentations with a variety of elements; enhance presentations with pictures, shapes, clip art, etc.; add multimedia elements to improve the effectiveness of PowerPoint presentations; work information graphics into PowerPoint presentations; collaborate with others in preparing and delivering PowerPoint presentations; integrate PowerPoint presentations with elements linking them to other media by using hyperlinks and action buttons; and create self-running presentations containing animations.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course covers the most important functions and features of Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 for students of any skill level, beginning with an Introduction to PowerPoint’s components. Students will learn how to create, save, and rearrange presentations. Major topics include: formatting slides, using graphics and multimedia, customizing Smart Art graphics and tables, modifying and distributing presentations, action buttons, custom slide shows and equations, and integrating Microsoft Office files.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Microsoft Word (TCH-161)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    July 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Computers and Information Technology

    Number of Credits:
    2

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: create various types of documents through Microsoft Word; insert headers, footers, footnotes, endnotes, etc. into a word document to maximize the professional look of the document; produce and use templates, form letters, mailing labels, and directories; use Word features to collaborate on documents with co-workers; create and make changes to title pages, tables of contents, lists, letterheads, and various other in-document features; and create templates for online forms and enhance those forms using macros and other relevant features.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course familiarizes students with the Microsoft Word program and provides a variety of features available in the application as well as strategies to maximize productivity. By learning the essentials of the program, students learn how to produce, edit, format, view, display, and print documents such formal letters, business presentations, and research papers.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    Modern Yiddish (YID-101)
    Location:
    This exam is NOT available to take online. Please contact us if you are interested in taking the exam at one of our location testing sites.

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Language

    Number of Credits:
    3

    This exam is NOT available to take online. Please contact us if you are interested in taking the exam at one of our location testing sites.
    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: demonstrate proficiency in the following grammatical rules: word pronunciation (vocalized and non-vocalized); indefinite and definite articles; non-possessive and possessive adjectives; present, past and future tenses; conjugation of verbs within sentences; sentence structure and word order; prefixes and suffixes; identification of root words. Students prove comprehension of written texts through translation exercises and by answering questions based on the texts; write short compositions that adhere to the basic grammatical rules of Yiddish and sentences as full responses to aural exercises. In order to achieve the above goals of comprehension and composition, students must successfully acquire a basic vocabulary of at least 500 words.

    Instruction:
    This course provides students with an introduction to the basic structures and vocabulary of Yiddish. Students develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Yiddish. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Yiddish, Judaic Studies, Language, Religion, or Eastern European Studies (4/19).


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    Motor Development ( Formerly Motor Development (SCI-302) ) (SCI-222)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    January 2015 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Exercise Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: illustrate and describe the developmental continuum for life-span motor behavior; discuss each component of biological development and the changes each area brings at different life stages; evaluate how perception and information-processing affect motor control as well human development; compare the stages of motor development across the life span and describe the changes as one ages; describe the purposes of motor assessment and identify the tools necessary for each stage; and analyze the sociocultural influences on motor development and identify the role different influences play.

    Instruction:
    This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. This is a science-based course covering background, theory, and research in the field of physical growth and motor behavior across the life span, as well as the practical application of these concepts. The course begins with an introduction to changes in the body, from neurological to physiological and discusses what factors affect these changes. The course then focuses on motor control and development through every life stage. Sociocultural influences are described. Students learn how to assess these changes and understand their importance as a factor of human growth.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Exercise Science, or Physical Education (1/15).


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    Multimedia and the Web (TCH-130)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Computers and Information Technology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe and discuss the theory and concepts involved in the design of web pages; demonstrate the use of various tools and techniques, including HTML, XHTML, and Internet Explorer and employ current web browser, text editing, and graphics composition skills to design and develop interactive web pages; differentiate between what makes an effective and a poorly designed web page and be able to critically evaluate them; use a professional Website Development tool (Adobe Dreamweaver CS6); use various tools and techniques, including FTP and Internet Explorer and employ current web browser, text editing, graphics composition skills to design and develop an interactive web page for a client; and identify what should be done to effectively communicate to a target audience through web pages.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course focuses on designing functional Web pages and applications utilizing proper interface design techniques. Topics include: techniques used in designing interactive functions involved in typical e-commerce and e-learning applications, human factors and accessible Web pages. This course presents the important practical guidelines for good interface and screen design. The guidelines reflect a mix of human behavior, science, and art, and are organized within the context of the interface design process.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Design (12/14).


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    Music Education (ECE-302)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Education

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain the role that music and movement have in helping children to develop both physically and psychologically; critically analyze the influence of curriculum standards, social, and environmental factors on students’ learning outcomes; compare and contrast how infants and young children are assessed; describe how music and movement can be integrated into curricula that target early learners; identify the critical factors associated with creating a classroom environment that facilitates the inclusion of music and movement as learning strategies.

    Instruction:
    This course teaches participants how to engage young children in active learning through the use of music and motor activities. Students develop an understanding of how to develop curriculum materials and learning environments that foster the mental and physical development of young children. The readings and practice materials are designed to engage course participants in critical thought to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are necessary to effectively educate young children. Students gain a deeper understanding of the important role that music and movement play in the academic, psychological, social, and physical development of children. Additionally, students explore the importance of curricula and proper assessment strategies in meeting the individualized needs of early learners.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Music and Movement (8/18).


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    Nutrition Life Cycle (NUT-210)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Nutrition

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze the different physiologic changes that occur across different age groups; identify the different nutritional challenges of each age group; apply the science of nutritional assessment in different age groups; apply the science and knowledge of nutrition and dietetics across different age groups; analyze the effects of diseases on the health of different age groups; compare the effects of different foods on different nutritional and disease related conditions across different age groups; apply the science of nutrition and foods in recommending food choices to different age groups; and develop a thorough understanding of the internal and external factors affecting nutrition and food choices across different age groups.

    Instruction:
    To be posted.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Nutrition (8/18).


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    Nutritional Cooking (CUL-202)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Culinary Arts and Event Planning

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine nutritional guidelines and the new food pyramid; evaluate how carbohydrates, proteins and fats are classified; distinguish between fat and water soluble vitamins; determine how to incorporate major and trace minerals into recipes; arrange and formulate menus that address the needs of those affected by heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and arthritis; and compose recipes for healthy meals.

    Instruction:
    This course is an overview of the field of nutritional cooking. Major topics include: nutritional guidelines, carbohydrates, proteins and fats, weight control, and recipes for healthier meals.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Culinary Arts, Nutrition for Food Service, or Healthy Cooking (8/18).


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    Nutritional Counseling (NUT-102)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Nutrition

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss appropriate counseling techniques for various clinical settings; apply the science of nutrition and foods in recommending food choices; identify appropriate nutrition educational materials and strategies to affect diet change; counsel nutrition clients appropriately; demonstrate understanding of nutrition care documentation through maintenance of nutrition center files; exhibit professionalism in counseling environment by assuming responsibility for effective use of resources and following the nutrition center code of conduct; and evaluate valid and reliable resources of nutrition information.

    Instruction:
    This course focuses on nutritional counseling, an integral part of medical nutrition therapy. Students learn to complete a nutrition assessment and develop a plan of care for both individuals and groups. The course focuses on the connection between the plan of care and nutrition counseling skills. Students learn to use the appropriate tools for nutrition assessment, develop a plan of care, and provide nutrition education and counseling to promote healthy diet changes. Principles of weight management and behavioral modifications strategies are used as a model.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Nutrition, Health, and Wellness Coaching (8/18).


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    Organizational Behavior (BUS-302)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2016 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the various factors that influence organizational behavior, including diversity of backgrounds of the members, emotions, moods, personalities and values; identify the factors that can influence the perceptions held by members of an organization and methods by which perception can be altered; assist in the development and application of motivational strategies that can be employed to improve performance in an organizational setting; distinguish between the different types of organizational communication, including formal, informal, upward, downward and lateral communication and identify strategies for improving communications within organizations; compare and contrast leadership and management and determine the characteristics that make successful managers and leaders; identify the bases of power within an organization and tactics that can be used within an organization to increase power and influence; and describe the manner in which organizational culture is established and the characteristics of organizational culture that can improve or hurt organizational performance.

    Instructions:
    This course is a study of behavior in organizations and influences of individual, group, and organizational processes on performance. The course covers a variety of topics, including: the processes of making and implementing decisions, effective communication in an organizational environment and the dynamics of office and organizational politics. Other concepts deal with motivation, solving conflicts, interpersonal communication and creating and maintaining positive organizational cultures and environments. Instruction is offered in the form of a course syllabus and study guide, an assigned textbook with reading assignments, a PowerPoint study guide and provided audio/visual presentations. Students are expected to complete the course of study set forth in the syllabus to properly prepare for the final examination. Prerequisite: Some background (including one or more college-level courses) in psychology is strongly recommended. One or more courses in college-level English and/or sociology are helpful.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Marketing, Finance, Economics, Human Resources, or as a general elective (6/16).


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    Pathophysiology and Pharmacology (SCI-311)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Allied Health

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learners Outcome:

    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: describe various pharmaceutical milestones that occurred throughout the 1800-1900s, the origin and content of the various drug consumer safety laws, and function of the FDA; differentiate between the chemical, generic, and trade/brand names of a drug; identify the various forms in which drugs are manufactured; explain the difference between various types of tablets, and distinguish an ointment, from a cream, or a lotion; describe and differentiate the 10 different routes of drug administration, the advantages, and disadvantages of each; describe how the liver metabolizes drugs, and how doses are adjusted for patients with liver or kidney diseases, elderly, or premature infants; identify the seven rights of drug administration, how to reverse drug toxicity, and recognize certain drugs allergies, and drug-food interactions; discuss therapeutic effects of the different categories of drugs used to treat urinary, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, cardiac, pulmonary, hematologic, gynecologic, endocrine, neurologic, psychiatric, ophthalmic, ENT (ear nose throat), analgesic conditions; identify the component parts of the immune response, and how vaccines work; and compare and contrast how local, regional, spinal, and epidural anesthesia drugs are given.

     

     

    Instructions:

    Pathophysiology and Pharmacology is an introduction to the world of drugs and pharmaceuticals for students who intend to enter the healthcare profession. The exam discusses common drugs for various ailments and their chemical structures and introduces students to the processes by which various drugs are indicated and administered.

     

     

    Credit recommendation:

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Nursing, Healthcare, or Health-wellness educator (6/17).


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    Physiological Psychology (PSY-303)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe key principles of physiological psychology, psychopharmacology, physiological research methods, and the critical role of the nervous system; analyze the physiology behind sensation, perception, sleeping, eating, and feeling; evaluate the physiology of learning, memory, and communication processes; and explain physiological factors involved in neurological, anxiety-related, schizophrenia-related, and addictive disorders.

    Instruction:
    This self-study course explores physiological psychology, which relate to the biological influences on human and animal behavior. Topics include structures and functions of the nervous system, psychopharmacology and research methods, the senses, movement, emotion, eating/digestion, learning, memory, and the neurology of psychological disorders. The unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major (version 2.0, August, 2013).

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education (12/14).


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    Principles of Accounting I (ACC-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze financial transactions and determine whether they are working with asset, liability or equity accounts; record transactions in proper accounting format; prepare balance sheets, income statements, and the statement of cash flows; evaluate inventory costing systems; and apply basic accounting internal control principles over cash.

    Instructions:
    This is an introduction to the field of accounting and focuses on how financial information is developed and utilized to prepare and interpret financial statements, the fundamentals of the accounting cycle (recording, summarizing, and reporting), and the preparation of financial reports, inventory and internal control.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting, Business, Business Administration, or Finance (8/18).


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    Principles of Accounting II (ACC-102)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the basic accounting approaches and guidelines for assessment relating to different types of investments; explain the fair value option for measuring and reporting investments; prepare the property, plant, and equipment section on a balance sheet; distinguish between land and land improvement costs; explain depreciation; distinguish between service life and physical life; explain cost, service life, salvage value, depreciable base, and book value; describe the operating cycle; distinguish between an employee and an independent contractor; distinguish between gross pay and net pay; record journal entries for payroll and withholdings; record the payroll taxes levied on the employer; identify the characteristics of corporations and their organizations; distinguish between common and preferred stocks, carefully detailing the rights and features of each class; compute earnings per share and book value per share; discuss the following assumptions: entity, going-concern, periodicity, monetary unit, and stable currency; differentiate between the indirect and direct methods of preparing a cash flow statement; and apply methods of horizontal and vertical analysis and use ratio analysis.

    Instructions:
    This course focuses on accounting as related to partnerships, corporations and manufacturing concerns. Topics include: long term investments, property, plant and equipment, current liabilities, employer obligations, long – term obligations, corporate, equity accounting, financial reporting and connects, financial analysis, and the statement of cash flows.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting, Business, Business Administration, or Finance (8/18).


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    Principles of Finance (FIN-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: articulate principles relevant to finance and valuations; calculate the time value of money, including the present and future values of cash and cash flow streams; describe the effects of interest rates on valuation of many different financial products; assess the theoretical values of stocks and bonds based on various school of thought, formulas and projections; explain the effect of risk on stock and bond valuations; engage in the process of capital budgeting; and apply cost of capital principles and those of the capital asset pricing model.

    Instructions:
    This course introduces students to principles relevant to finance, budgeting, interest rates, present values and securities valuation. Major topics include: quantitative and technological tools used in finance; how firms make decisions in financial management issues; strategies for pricing financial assets and how firms manage financial capital in the short and long term.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Finance, Accounting, Business, or Business Administration (8/18).


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    Principles of Group Communication (COM-102)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Communications

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss the major theories associated with the study of small group communication; determine how individual roles are filled in small groups; compare strategies in group communication that facilitate the achievement of group goals; develop skills in understanding, analyzing, and evaluating small group experiences; identify barriers to effective small group communication; and apply small group communication knowledge for group problem solving scenarios in case studies. Students will have the opportunity to acquire the necessary skills to communicate effectively in a variety of group settings upon completion of this course.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with an understanding of the principles of small group communication. Students learn the theory and current research on group communication as well as the challenges of communicating in groups and explore the foundations of small group communication (verbal and nonverbal elements and listening), the development of the group, and the challenges that small groups face due to diversity and internal conflicts. Critical thinking skills are developed by analyzing how groups are formed, group problem-solving techniques, conflict resolution, and ultimately applying practical leadership principles with the group dynamic. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resources, Marketing, Education, Management, Project Management, or as an Elective in Business (4/19).


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    Principles of Health Promotion and Education (HSC-203)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    January 2015 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Exercise Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the background for athletic training and its employment opportunities; discuss the components of the pre-participation physical exam and fitness testing procedures; relate nutritional health to performance and discuss the nutritional needs of the active individual; outline varying environmental conditions and describe how the illnesses they cause can be prevented; illustrate different forms of injury prevention and the liabilities inherent in sports training; describe how preexisting medical conditions affect the trainee and be able to recognize clinical injuries in all parts of the body; detect certain emergency situations and describe the role and responsibilities of EMS professionals; relate rehabilitation, healing, and drugs to therapeutic exercise and synthesize different treatment plans; and describe financial and human resource management strategies for personal trainers.

    Instruction:
    This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. This is a course for students with no prior background in the subject. The course begins with a background description of the field and continues with the history of the profession, then shifts to the actual role of the health education professional.  Focus is placed on the ethics, responsibilities, and required certifications one is required to have in the field. Students also learn about theories and planning models of health promotion. Additionally, the course teaches the setting for health education and promotion, as well as the agencies involved. Finally, the course covers the future of this growing field.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Exercise Science, or Physical Education (1/15).


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    Principles of Intercultural Communication (COM-103)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Communications

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss terms, concepts, and theories related to intercultural communication; describe the impact that religion, class, gender, race, education, and ethnicity have on communication and interpersonal interactions; examine the elements of intercultural communication competence; analyze potential barriers to intercultural communication; compare different cultural dimensions and values (i.e. power distance, individualism, uncertainty avoidance, etc. of different populations and groups); and evaluate specific intercultural communication problems, illustrating the historical, cultural, economic, and political differences that have an impact on their solutions.

    Instruction:
    This course introduces students to cross-cultural communication processes. Case studies accompany each chapter so students can apply theoretical concepts to “real life” scenarios. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communication, International Marketing, Journalism, Media Studies, or as an elective in Business (4/19).


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    Probability and Statistics (MAT-304)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Mathematics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: calculate and use measures of central tendency to draw conclusions about data and organize data graphically; calculate probabilities and apply Bayes’ Theorem; determine continuous and joint probabilities and calculate expected values; perform calculations related to binomial, negative binomial, and Poisson distributions; solve applications involving common continuous distributions; determine the sample size needed to fit a situation and determine probabilities using the sampling distribution of the mean; construct confidence intervals for proportions and variance and determine maximum likelihood estimators; describe type I and type II errors and perform hypothesis tests; fit data using simple linear regression and compute correlation coefficients; and interpret results involving multiple linear regression models.

    Instruction:
    This course provides students with a working knowledge of the concepts in probability and statistics and the underlying theory and applications. Topics include: probability, discrete distributions, continuous distributions, sampling distributions, point estimation, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression, multiple regression, and nonlinear regression. Instructional methods include Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting, Business, Computer Science, Data Sciences, Economics, Finance, or Mathematics (4/19).


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    Programming in Python (TCH-401)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Computers and Information Technology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: debug common errors in Python; define data types and analyze functions; examine conditional statements and the iterative process; manipulate strings and lists and recognize mutable versus immutable data structures; access modules and import files; analyze classes and objects; implement recursive definitions and catch exceptions; and work with dictionaries and recognized advantages of inheritance.

    Instructions:
    This 8-module course provides students with a working knowledge of concepts and programming techniques in Python. Topics include: debugging, data types, functions, conditionals, iteration, strings, lists, dictionaries, modules, filed, recursion, classes, and objects. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the associate/certificate degree category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Computer Information Systems, Cyber Security, Information Technologies, or as an elective in Business or Mathematics (4/19).


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    Quantitative Analysis (MAT-303)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Mathematics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the use of modeling in quantitative analysis; develop useful and accurate decision trees; formulate and interpret characteristics of linear regression models; compute the economic order quantity (EOQ) and reorder point (ROP) for inventory problems; solve and interpret linear programming models both graphically and algebraically; model and solve maximal-flow, shortest-route, and minimal-spanning tree problems; describe the basic queuing system configurations and all three parts of a queuing system; and analyze simulation models as applied to inventory control and queuing theory.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with a working knowledge of the most important basic concepts of quantitative analysis in business and management by teaching various modeling techniques for problems related to business and management. Topics include: decision trees, linear and multivariate regression, inventory methods, linear programming techniques, transportation and network problems, queuing theory, and simulation. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting, Business, Computer Science, Data Sciences, Economics, Finance, or Mathematics (4/19).


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    Recruitment and Selection (BUS-303 )
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the importance of organizational training programs and the characteristics of various types of such programs; assist in the conducting of a training needs analysis to determine the goals and objectives of an organizational training program; assist in the designing of a training program to comply with existing organizational needs; facilitate the success of trainees and organizational training program using various methods; determine methods of training that are most likely to succeed based on a given set of organizational objectives; evaluate the success of organizational training programs by reviewing the data from the results of such programs; describe various types of organizational training programs and identify their key components and objectives.

    Instructions:
    This course is a comprehensive discussion and analysis of organizational training programs, their goals, objectives and effects. Major topics include: organizational systems and their dynamics, strategies and practices important in training and development, process of determining the need for, developing, implementing and assessing organizational training programs. Focus is on conducting a training needs analysis and designing and implementing the program, along with a system for facilitating the success of the trainees. Other topics include specific types of training programs and training programs that apply to different elements of the organization’s personnel.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resource Management, Management, or Finance (8/18).


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    Research Methods in Psychology (PSY-201)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe psychological research method goals, processes, descriptive techniques, and correlational techniques; explain the principles of experimentation, the role of variables, and the types of validity and reliability; apply knowledge of experimental design and small-N experimentation; investigate quasi-experimental design, results interpretation, and results presentation; plan, conduct, interpret and disseminate original research.

    Instructions:
    This self-study course is designed to introduce students to research methods in psychology. Students learn the goals and processes of research and descriptive and correlational approaches to research. After learning about the basic principles of experimentation and the concepts of reliability and validity, students plan and conduct simple and complex experiments using between- and within-group designs, small-n designs, and quasi-experimental designs. Students also learn to disseminate research through research reports and oral/written presentations. The unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major (version 2.0, August, 2013).

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education (12/14).


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    Small Business Management (BUS-401 )
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the importance of organizational training programs and the characteristics of various types of such programs; assist in the conducting of a training needs analysis to determine the goals and objectives of an organizational training program; assist in the designing of a training program to comply with existing organizational needs; facilitate the success of trainees and organizational training program using various methods; determine methods of training that are most likely to succeed based on a given set of organizational objectives; evaluate the success of organizational training programs by reviewing the data from the results of such programs; and describe various types of organizational training programs and identify their key components and objectives.

    Instructions:
    This course examines fundamental principles, problems and practices of entrepreneurship, focusing on providing students with a foundation of small business management skills and the creativity and knowledge of what it takes to develop a successful business. Major topics include: marketing strategies and principles including location, pricing methods, and funding, developing a successful online business, and elements of a good business plan and other aspects of business ownership.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Entrepreneurship, Management, Finance, or Human Resource Management (8/18).


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    Social Ethics (SOC-104)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Sociology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify and describe the classic and current theories of ethics; construct an ethical system; apply ethical approaches to various scenarios and moral dilemmas; identify major issues in environmental, business, medicine, and media ethics; describe the main issues surrounding the ethics of taking human life in specific circumstances such as suicide or euthanasia; discuss key ethical arguments in the controversy over abortion rights; present various approaches to the morality of lying, cheating, stealing, and sexual promiscuity; and look at ethical dilemmas in the news through the lens of various ethical approaches.

    Instruction:
    This course discusses the theory and practice of ethics from the basics of the nature of morality and the classic and more recent theories of morality to their applications in current issues of controversy. Major topics include: procedure for setting up a moral system, ethical issues related to the value of human life, where questions arise in matters such as abortion, suicide, and mercy death.
    Additional topics include: ethical issues in medicine, business, media, and environment by examining the moral dilemmas as well as the status of major questions in current dialogue and law.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology or Ethics (8/18).


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    Social Psychology (PSY-315)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    At the end of this course, students will be able to: describe foundational research regarding social context factors and social motives by examining the historical evolution of the field of social psychology; interpret how social cognition and self-concept via introspection and observation impacts self-control; examine the impact of cognitive dissonance and how attitudes can change based on the social context; determine the impacts of conformity and group process within the field of social psychology; analyze Evolutionary Psychology’s and Social Exchange Theory’s explanation of prosocial behaviors; and illustrate situational and social causes of aggression and prejudice.

    Instruction:
    This course is a dynamic study of how peoples’ thoughts, feelings and actions are affected by others. Major topics include: attitudes, prejudice, conformity, groups, interpersonal attraction and prosocial behaviors.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology or Psychology (8/18).


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    Sociology of the Ba’al Teshuva Movement (SOC-303)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2014 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Sociology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the Ba’al Teshuva movement; explain how the Ba’al Teshuva enter the movement and their typical socialization process; recognize the social challenges faced by the basic Ba’al Teshuva and the nuances which continue to identify the Ba’al Teshuva from the rest of the community; and discuss how this movement may impact the future of the Orthodox community.

    Instructions:
    This proficiency examination assesses students’ knowledge of the Ba’al Teshuva movement which began in the second half of the Twentieth century as Jews returned to Orthodoxy and includes the perceived socio-historic challenges which the movement overcame, as well as those socio-historic factors which supported its development. At the completion of the course, students will be able to relate the entry points to the movement, such as synagogues and Ba’al Teshuva institutions of study, discuss the challenges of recruitment, describe how the Ba’al Teshuva tends to adapt to Orthodox culture and focus on which aspects pose special challenges, describe the cultural stigmas that the Ba’al Teshuva carries in the Orthodox community and how such stigma can be dealt with and explore the impact that the Ba’al Teshuva movement has had on the general Orthodox community. The proficiency examination also evaluates students’ knowledge of the history, meaning, and social nuances of the Ba’al Teshuva movement, as well as the sociological terminologies associated with explaining it.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Religious Studies, Judaic Studies, Anthropology, or Jewish History (4/14).


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    Special Events and Meeting Planning (SMP-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Culinary Arts and Event Planning

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: identify and explain the basic components of the event market; detail the elements used in designing and holding an event; describe the principles of sales and marketing an event; identify laws, contracts, permits and licenses that are necessary for execution of an event.

    Instructions:
    This course introduces students to the exciting world of event planning, corporate meeting planning and conventions. Topics include new trends and techniques. Case studies are explored.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communication, Office Administration, Marketing, Journalism, Public Relations, or Sales (6/17).


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    Sport and Exercise Psychology (PSY-340)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Exercise Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the background for sport and exercise psychology and related employment opportunities; propose effective teaching, coaching, and training practices for diverse participants; examine environmental influences that affect sport and exercise participants; describe group cohesion, team dynamics, leadership, and communication; design a skills training program to enhance individual performance; examine behavior change techniques that increase motivation and combat negative physical and mental health issues; and facilitate psychological growth and character development.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with an understanding of the scientific and professional practice of sport and exercise psychology and assists student comprehension through research, concepts, and theories of people and their behaviors to think critically of the practical application of that knowledge. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Physical Education, Exercise Science, Sport Psychology, Health and Wellness, or Nutrition (4/19).


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    Sports Nutrition (NUT-103)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Exercise Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss how sports nutrition knowledge can be applied; identify factors that need to be considered when developing an individualized sports nutrition plan; describe how nutrients are digested, absorbed, transported, and assimilated in the body; explain the three energy systems, their characteristics, and the metabolic pathways associated with each and how they work to supply ATP during sport performance; explain how the macronutrients are utilized during exercise; discuss the type, quantity, and timing of carbohydrate, protein and fat consumption before, during and after exercise or competition; describe the functions of vitamins, their effects on energy systems, their deficiency and toxicity symptoms, their importance to sports performance, and vitamin-rich food sources and meal-planning tips; list the dietary recommendations, functions, effects on energy systems, deficiency and toxicity symptoms, importance to sport performance, food sources, and meal-planning tips for the major and trace minerals; identify some of the commonly used ergogenic aid used by athletes, their proposed beneficial effects and potential adverse outcomes; outline the nutritional considerations of endurance vs strength athletes; discuss the energy systems that are utilized during strength/power and endurance exercise; apply knowledge of sports nutrition to meal planning and event logistics that need to be considered various individual and team sporting events; describe the nutritional considerations for athletes who have diabetes, are pregnant, child and teen athletes, college athletes, vegetarians, and team sport athletes.

    Instruction:
    This course teaches students to apply nutrition science to fitness, exercise and sport. Instruction focuses on how sports nutrition combines the principles of nutrition science and exercise physiology with the underlying objective to improve physical performance and provides students with an understanding of the relationships with diet, food nutrients and essential dietary components and optimal sports performance across a range of physical activities, life stages and health conditions.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sports Nutrition (8/18).


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    Substance Abuse Counseling (PSY-320)
    Location:
    Various, distance learning format.

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced).

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Counseling and Social Work

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the role of the mental health professional in prevention and treatment of substance abuse; describe the classification of drugs; compare the models of addiction; analyze the concerns when working with culturally and ethnically diverse populations; investigate the issues of maintaining confidentiality and an ethical standard; analyze the methods for screening, assessing and diagnosing a client; list the elements for motivational interviewing and brief interventions; analyze the basic techniques for the treatment of alcohol and other drugs; describe the relapse prevention and recovery process; compare the twelve step and other types of support groups; and explain the impacts that alcohol and drugs have on children, families, adult children and codependency.

    Instruction:
    This course provides a comprehensive coverage of alcohol and other drug prevention, treatment, and recovery for the alcohol and other drug field. Major topics include: cultural competence, assessment, models of prevention, co-occurring disorders, other behavioral addictions, children and families, and ethics and confidentiality.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the lower division/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Services, Social Sciences, Social Work, Counseling, Addiction Studies, or Psychology (8/18).


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    The Jewish Child in Traditional Jewish Society (SOC-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Psychology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate a broad and in-depth knowledge of traditional Jewish attitudes towards children and child-rearing from Biblical, Talmudic, medieval, and contemporary times; explain various traditional Jewish conceptions of childhood and parenting and their sources, educational approaches, methods of socialization, and views about individuality; describe how Jewish children have been uniquely affected during specific times of persecution; cite appropriate examples of how youth movements and modern social tendencies have impacted traditional Judaism in more recent times; and identify ways in which recent traditional authorities deal with current realities in their suggestions for child-rearing practices.

    Instruction:
    This self-study assesses students’ knowledge of the role of the child in traditional Jewish society. Students study the Biblical and Talmudic attitude towards children and child-rearing as well as some sources from Medieval times and how contemporary traditional authorities approach the subject within the contemporary milieu. Specific topics include: methods of socialization, educational approaches and the relationship between child and parent and what obligations each one is considered to have towards the other, and the level of individuality that should be encouraged. Special attention is focused on understanding how children played a specific and unique role in various times of persecution as well as the influence of youth movements in more recent times with relation to the general Jewish society. Students will also discuss contemporary challenges, particularly the problem of at-risk youth in the traditional community.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religion, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, or as a General Elective (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).


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    The Law of Business and Business Organizations (BUS-311)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2016 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the various documents that must be filed with government agencies in order to create various types of businesses; explain the characteristics of corporations and various other business formations, especially as they relate to tax and liability issues; compare and contrast various business forms and determine which type is most appropriate in a particular situation; determine when a corporate director or officer has breached a duty to his or her company and the available shareholder remedies; describe the ways in which corporations can raise capital, including “going public” and summarize the most important securities laws relevant to IPO’s, exchanges and corporate finance; apply important employment laws such as those that protect the health and safety of employees, protect employees from dangerous or hostile environments or wrongful termination and the rules regarding employment discrimination.

    Instructions:
    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the principles and most significant laws pertaining to business organizations and the ability to apply many of those principles and rules. This course deals with the characteristics of various business organizations, including publicly held and closely held corporations, general and limited partnerships, sole proprietorships and limited liability companies. These various forms of business are compared and contrasted to determine the advantages and disadvantages of creating and maintaining each form. The course covers various aspects of corporate operations, including the responsibilities of corporate directors and officers as well as principles relevant to corporate finance. The course concludes with a survey of employment law principles relevant to business operations, including employee benefits and employment discrimination. Instruction is offered in the form of a course syllabus and study guide, an assigned textbook with reading assignments, a PowerPoint study guide and provided audio/visual presentations. Students are expected to complete the course of study set forth in the syllabus to properly prepare for the final examination. Prerequisite: Microeconomics (ECO-101) and Macroeconomics (ECO-102). Students must demonstrable significant experience in the study or practice of business, law or economics may be accepted in lieu of these prerequisites.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Marketing, Finance, or as a general elective (6/16).


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    The Music of the Orthodox Jew from Antiquity through the Twentieth Century (MUS-301)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Judaic Studies

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: identify the essential components of traditional Jewish music; compare and contrast Jewish music to the music of other ethnic groups amongst whom Jews have lived; link various trends in Jewish music to common roots; describe the theological and philosophical background to Jewish musical tendencies; compare and contrast the synagogue and folk music of different Jewish communities; apply knowledge of Jewish music to understand the historical underpinnings of any given piece of music; identify the changes that have occurred to Jewish music throughout the years and trace their sources; and provide historical background for the state of Jewish music today.

    Instructions:
    This exam assesses students’ knowledge of the music of the Orthodox Jew from antiquity through the end of the twentieth century, including the instruments known from the First and Second Temple and how they were used.  It also covers the history of synagogue music for prayer and cantillation of the Bible and traces the development of the art of chazzanus and the folk song.  Numerous Jewish cultures, both Ashkenazic and Sephardic will be discussed.  Students discover how Jewish music developed in different circumstances and ultimately examine how the music of the Orthodox community became what it is today.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Music, Jewish History, or History of Music (6/17).


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    The Science of Nutrition (SCI-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    Version 1: May 2013 - July 2018. Version 2: August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define various classes of nutrients and discuss the importance of each to human health, focusing on the relationship of water and fluids to electrolyte balance; identify components of a healthy diet, including guidelines based on the USDA food pyramid; discuss different forms of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins important in diets and the best sources for these nutrients and recommended daily allowances for each; identify nutrients necessary for the body to produce its own secretions and other materials necessary for homeostasis; describe the risks for food-borne pathogens and discuss potential methods to reduce risks posed by these pathogens; compare and contrast nutritional needs for adult males, adult females, children, pregnant women, etc.; outline various vitamins and minerals and foods necessary to promote bone health, effects of antioxidants, and energy metabolism; describe the digestive process as it relates to energy metabolism and explain the more common digestive disorders; and outline causes of various nutritional disorders, including obesity, diabetes (Types I and II), malnutrition, etc. and their long-term consequences and treatment options.

    Instruction:
    Version 1 and 2: This self-study of the human diet contains substantial elements of biology and chemistry as they relate to course topics. Major topics include: Six classes of Nutrients (Organic and Inorganic) and their importance to a well-balanced diet, Sources of Important Nutrients and the value of obtaining these nutrients from certain foods, Impact of Physical Activity as it relates to Nutrition and Health, Nutrition-related diseases and disorders, Categories of people (children and pregnant women) and their need for special diets. An as additional requirement to textbook readings and study guide; students participate in the MyNutrition Lab with diet analysis for a period of two weeks and turn in the report generated by the system.

    Credit Recommendation:
    Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Nutrition or as a core science requirement (6/13). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Nutrition or a core science requirement (8/18 revalidation).


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    The Social Psychology of Dress (FAS-201)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Fashion Merchandising

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe how meanings of dress vary from society to society; explain the common purposes that dress serves (i.e., to protect, to communicate, or to personally satisfy); interpret scholarly publications about dress and ideas of research topics regarding dress; evaluate clothing as a form of human behavior, considering the social and cognitive factors influencing the management and perception of personal appearance in everyday life; assess the importance of social and cultural context in the creation and interpretation of clothing symbolism; differentiate psychological, sociological and anthropological perspectives of dress that influence appearance management; compare and contrast concepts and methods appropriate for the study of appearance in contemporary societies; and analyze how cultural and societal factors influence dress behaviors.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with basic concepts and theories from social psychology applied to dress and its connection to human behavior. Major topics include: how dress reflects self-feelings, clothing as part of a nonverbal communication system and how it relates to human behavior changes and communicates gender, race, religion, and position establishes social identities and affects interpersonal encounters. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the associate/certificate degree category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Psychology, or Fashion Merchandising (4/19).


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    Therapeutic Interviewing (PSY-310)
    Location:
    Various, distance learning format.

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced).

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Counseling and Social Work

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze the principles of the therapeutic relationship and how a therapeutic alliance is formed; ascertain the motivation of a client who enters treatment; identify the elements of conversational skills necessary for joining and maintaining an interview; describe reflecting skills that explore the content, feelings and meanings of the client’s story; identify questions and goal setting skills necessary for an effective therapeutic interview; analyze the principles of summarizing and terminating therapy sessions; investigate common mistakes that can lead to ineffective therapy; examine the intake, mental status exam and crisis counseling aspects of the therapeutic assessment interview; determine the skills needed for conducting a therapeutic interview with children, couples, families and groups; and compare the context of interviewing at the therapist’s office to the client’s home to alternative settings.

    Instruction:
    This course covers general principles of effective interviewing and provides students with foundational strategies, skills, and tools of therapeutic interviewing along with an understanding of the formats and settings in which they will be working. Instruction also focuses on equipping novice therapists with a basic understanding of interviewing and explores how they can develop the skills to become competent therapists.

    Credit recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Sciences, Social Work, Addiction Counseling, Psychology, Mental Health, or Counseling (8/18).


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    TOR – Introduction to Biology (SCI-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format / Jerusalem and other approved locations.

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    March 2016 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Science

    Number of Credits:
    4

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the proficiency examination, students will be able to: evaluate how the basic units of matter interact to produce the complex macromolecules that imbue living systems with the many properties that constitute the living state; interpret the scientific basis for declaring the cell as the basic unit of life; understand the scientific method and develop critical thinking in seeking to solve problems; analyze the nature of the different processes involved in cell metabolism, cellular respiration, fermentation and photosynthesis; describe the processes of the cell cycle, genetics, meiosis, the chromosomal basis of Inheritance, the molecular basis of inheritance from gene to protein, and the regulation of gene expression; describe the life processes carried out by plant and animal life forms as well as human biological processes and evaluate the different forms of ecology and ecosystems and how they apply to life on planet.

    Instruction:
    Introduction to Biology broadly covers the core concepts in Biology emphasizing a familiarity with the vocabulary and concepts relating to structures and functions of life forms. The exam covers the major areas of Biology, along with assessing students’ knowledge of basic subject matter including: cell structure and physiology, metabolism, cellular reproduction, Mendelian genetics, modern genetics, and genetic engineering, life processes, nutrition, respiration, circulation, excretion and regulation and the maintenance of homeostasis.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Biology or general science (3/16).


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    TOR – Principles of Earth Science (SCI-102)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format / Israel and other approved locations in the United States

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    March 2016 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Science

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the proficiency examination, students will be able to: describe the Earth’s interior and exterior structure; identify the composition of indigenous rocks and minerals; explain how weather and erosion affect the surface of the Earth; explain how earthquakes and volcanoes affect the Earth’s surface and the formation of islands and mountains; apply the scientific method in order to conduct scientific inquire and data gathering with respect to many aspects of Earth Science; interpret data relating to earthquakes such as Richter scale readings and meteorological data such as barometer readings; outline characteristics of various types of climates and be able to discuss whether humans have the ability to affect weather and climate on the Earth’s surface for both positive and negative results.

    Instruction:
    Principles of Earth Science covers a basic overview of Earth Science, focusing on the major principles relating to makeup of the planet Earth, the different processes that give it shape, and its dynamic systems and cycles. The exam assesses students’ knowledge of major topics such as weathering and erosion, how major disruptions such as earthquakes and volcanoes affect the development of the Earth’s surface, Meteorology and how weather is based on shifts in air masses, precipitation, and fronts. It also requires students to apply the scientific method in order to conduct scientific inquiry along with data gathering and interpretation.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Earth Science (3/16).


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    TOR – Sociology of Racial and Ethnic Groups (SOC-320)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format / Israel and other approved locations in the United States

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    March 2016 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Sociology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this proficiency examination, students will be able to: define such concepts as assimilation, pluralism, ascribed and achieved statuses, prejudice and discrimination; display basic knowledge of historical, socioeconomic, and political demographics of the U.S.; demonstrate critical thinking about different theories and perspectives pertaining to race, class, and gender; apply sociological concepts to the analysis of race and ethnicity to personal and/or family experience.

    Instruction:
    Sociology of Racial and Ethnic Groups examines the status of racial, ethnic, and cultural minority groups from historical, economic, and political perspective. The exam is designed to expand knowledge of theory, research, and current events in regards to the relations of race, ethnicity, gender and class in the United States. The exam covers concepts relating to assimilation, pluralism, ascribed and achieved statuses, prejudice and discrimination and assess students’ critical thinking skills and knowledge of basic subject matter including: historical, socioeconomic, and political demographics of the U.S. along with the various theories and perspectives pertaining to race, class, and gender.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Social Science, or Behavioral Science (3/16).


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    TOR – Studying Social Problems (SOC-330)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format / Israel and other approved locations in the United States

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    March 2016 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Sociology

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this proficiency examination, students will be able to discuss the nature and severity of selected social problems facing society: identify the multiple causes and consequences of social problems; critically evaluate the effectiveness of various social welfare strategies to alleviate the causes and consequences of social problems; explain and critically evaluate studies on a number of pressing social problems; cultivate a habit of reflecting upon and articulating their own engagement with the social world and grappling with causes and potential solutions to social problems.

    Instruction:
    Studying Social Problems is designed to provide a survey of selected contemporary social problems. Major topics covered on the exam include poverty, addiction and substance abuse, mental health, violence with a focus on family violence, crime, teen pregnancy, and health care issues. Students analyze the causes, severity, and consequences of the selected social problems in addition to evaluating social welfare strategies for alleviating social problems.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Social Sciences, Behavioral Sciences, or as a Social Work elective (3/16).


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    TOR Information Literacy (ENG-103)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format / Jerusalem and other approved locations.

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    March 2016 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    English

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this proficiency examination, students will be able to: access, evaluate and use information in an academic or work environment; research efficiently and find relevant information by developing appropriate research questions and using library resources as well as other sources; effectively access information electronically and be able to identify and evaluate information found on the internet; make an assessment of different aspects research sources including currency, relevancy, authority, and accuracy; help others who do not possess the same information-literacy skills to access information; organize information effectively and ethically; and utilize various methods which take into account different formats and audiences in order to share what has been learned through research.

    Instruction:
    This proficiency exam assesses students’ knowledge of critical concepts of information literacy along with their ability to effectively deploy the related skills and methodology necessary to be good researchers in academic settings, career work, and throughout life

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English (3/16).


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    Training and Development (BUS-304 )
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Business and Economics

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the importance of organizational training programs and the characteristics of various types of such programs; assist in the conducting of a training needs analysis to determine the goals and objectives of an organizational training program; assist in the designing of a training program to comply with existing organizational needs; facilitate the success of trainees and organizational training program using various methods; determine methods of training that are most likely to succeed based on a given set of organizational objectives; evaluate the success of organizational training programs by reviewing the data from the results of such programs; describe various types of organizational training programs and identify their key components and objectives.

    Instructions:
    This course is a comprehensive discussion and analysis of organizational training programs, their goals, objectives and effects. Major topics include: organizational systems and their dynamics, strategies and practices important in training and development, the process of determining the need for, developing, implementing and assessing organizational training programs, conducting a training needs analysis, design and implementation of the program, along with a system for facilitating the success of the trainees, and specific types of training programs and training programs that apply to different elements of the organization’s personnel.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Entrepreneurship, Management or Human Resources Management (8/18).


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    Understanding Media, Culture, and Technology (MED-101)
    Location:
    Various: distance learning format

    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)

    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.

    Subject Area:
    Communications

    Number of Credits:
    3

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the historical development of mass communication and explore the changing influence of media or individuals and society; assess the impact of technological innovations on social interaction, political processes, public relations, advertising, gaming and other media industries; compare different theoretical approaches to the study of technology; predict how mediated communication will affect careers in a variety of disciplines including business, entertainment, health, politics, advertising and education; interpret media policy, law, and ethics; and research careers in communications.

    Instructions:
    This course provides students with an understanding of the field of communications, from newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, firms, and cable, to the newer and interactive media of the digital present. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    Credit Recommendation:
    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Communication, Business, Journalism, Marketing, or Media Studies (4/19).


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