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We offer distance learning courses that are recommended for college credit by the NCCRS in the following subjects:

Business and Economics

Education Courses

Psychology

Cultural Studies

    History of Culture and Cuisine in the South and Its Effect on Society

    (HIS-210)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    July 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Cultural Studies


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the relationship between race, class, and ethnicity in the culinary and hospitality fields; determine the importance of family and generational traditions and cross-cultural influences in meal and menu formulation; explain how examining bias, socialization and inequity can encourage partnerships; and compare and contrast changing and evolving societal perceptions when opening a restaurant in a diverse city.

    History of Culture and Cuisine in the South and Its Effect on Society (MCS-210) is an undergraduate self-study course that culminates with a final exam. This course will examine the history of bias, racism, culture and diversity in the culinary and hospitality industry and how regional cooking and food can meld two races and have them become harmonious in both business and existence.

    In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Cultural Studies, General Studies or History (6/22).

    History of Sitcoms

    (COM-210)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Cultural Studies


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the relationship between a genre and society; determine the importance of the family nucleus and how it is derived by television and the Media; identify how sitcoms have influenced political decisions and affiliations; and compare and contrast changing technology, the future and societal changes.

    COM-210 is a self-study course that culminates with a final exam. This course will examine the history of sitcoms and comedies as a genre and their role in society, media, and arts. Topics include politics, humor as a tool for social engineering, the family unit, civil rights, generations, and the future in media.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/ associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Cultural Studies, General Studies or History (6/22).

    Introduction to Multicultural Studies

    (MCS-101)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Cultural Studies


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: investigate, explain, apply, and analyze the role of stereotypes in human relationships and how and why they develop; compare, explain, and analyze the concepts of race, ethnicity, culture, acculturation, class, heritage, gender, sexual orientation, religion, minority group and dominant groups; assess and evaluate racism, sexism, prejudice, and discrimination and examine how and why they develop and what we can do to eradicate negativity and perceived prejudices; compare and evaluate the principal demographic characteristics of the population of the United States; describe, analyze and evaluate how various aspects of culture, art music, and literature, media, and performing arts institutions, inform our understanding of pluralism and diversity and contribute to society; analyze and evaluate the major policies of “dominant groups” toward minority groups and why this term may or may not be utilized in society; and describe, examine, analyze and evaluate the rationale for all citizens to embrace the existing and growing diversity of our society in the United States.

    Introduction to Multicultural Studies (MCS-101) will introduce to you a survey of the major topics involved in the existing and growing diversity in American society. This course is designed to engage you in an examination of the increasingly important issues of cultural, ethnic and racial diversity as well as gender and class differences in the United States. You will explore the unique links that exists between pluralistic politics and the social, cultural and economic diversity of Americans. The course also analyzes the complexity of American society from a variety of perspectives using reading materials from many disciplines, including history, the social sciences and literature.

    In the lower division baccalaureate division, 3 semester hours in Anthropology, History, Multicultural Studies, Sociology, or as a General Elective (5/21).

    The Art of Film Watching

    (COM-210)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    May 2023 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Cultural Studies


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: describe the fundamental principles of film form and style, including narrative features, cinematography, editing, and sound; outline the basic formal elements of several film genres and film types, across a range of classic and contemporary U.S. and foreign films, including black-and-white, silent, and/or subtitled movies; analyze to describe what students see and hear when they watch a movie; discuss and write critically and effectively about the ways films move us aesthetically, intellectually, and emotionally.

    The Art of Film Watching introduces students to film aesthetics through the analysis of film form and style. The course aims to provide students with fluency in and understanding of film’s unique language as it evolves technologically, historically and generically. Beyond teaching students how to recognize and describe formal choices and techniques, students will be asked to engage in close readings of films, attending to the greater aesthetic significance and stakes of formal choices and innovations evident within a particular film, directorial oeuvre, period, or movement.

    improve student learning. The course discusses methods for planning assessments that are integrated with instruction, crafting assessment tools, crafting scoring rubrics, formative assessment and feedback, grading and evaluating students, assessing higher-order thinking, interpreting state-mandated and other standardized test scores, and aligning assessment with state standards. The course also discusses attributes of assessment practices such as reliability and validity.

    In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Liberal Arts, Communications or Film Studies (5/23).