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We offer distance learning courses that are recommended for college credit by the NCCRS in the following subjects:

Religious Studies

    Advanced Bible: Women in the Torah

    (BIB-378)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: to identify the main references to women in the Pentateuch; to demonstrate knowledge of the interpretations of the midrash, rishonim, and ba’alei musar of incidents involving women in the Torah, and to identify the textual sources of these interpretations; to recognize laws of the Torah that apply specifically to women; to understand how contemporary female traditional Orthodox Torah teachers interpret laws of the Torah which apply to women in a manner relevant and understandable to contemporary women; to demonstrate how learning about the women of the Torah reveals universal truths about women, Jewish women, male/female relationships, and marriage; and to apply the lessons learned from women of the Torah to contemporary situations.

    This learning experience seeks to bring deeper understanding of the main female characters of the Pentateuch and of numerous Torah laws pertaining specifically to women. The course will examine the relevance of the female characters as interpreted by the rabbis from the composers of the midrash through current times, as well as the lessons gleaned by contemporary female Torah teachers. A major focus will be the lessons learned from the women of the Torah as they apply to Jewish women today in daily life and spiritual growth. Some of the specific topics will include analysis of Chava, the Matriarchs, and Miriam. Laws examined will include family purity and divorce.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Bible Studies, Judaic Studies, Religion, Sociology, or Women’s Studies (5/21).

    Advanced Deuteronomy

    (BIB-440)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the concepts and themes found throughout the entire Book of Deuteronomy along with its medieval and modern commentaries; Students will be able to solve apparent contradictions in the verses and explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insight; Students will also explain legal rulings derived from the text found in major law books as well as interpret ethical issues which emerge from the text; In addition, students will be required to write five-one hundred-word essays connecting sources to a variety of themes using source material from the Chumash and selected commentaries; One essay will require the student to demonstrate an ability to translate from Hebrew to English.

    Advanced Deuteronomy (BIB-440) will assess the students’ knowledge of the Book of Deuteronomy on an advanced level. Students will be required to have a broad knowledge of classical commentaries on the Book of Deuteronomy including: The Talmud, Midrash, Rashi, Ramban, Sforno, and R’ Samson R. Hirsch among others. Students will have a deep understanding of how the commentators analyze the Bible, with a focus on philosophical and ethical principles derived from the verses. Topics include: the purpose of repeating the Torah, Moses prayer to enter the land, the Ten Commandments, Shema, the court system, Moses blessing and more.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/22).

    Advanced Exodus I

    (BIB-310)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate knowledge of the text and commentary on the entire Book of Exodus; Mastery of the material will include the ability to analyze and explain select sections of the text along with Rashi’s commentary; This analysis will include identifying the textual problem Rashi is trying to resolve and how he resolves it; When relevant, students should also be able to explain Rashi’s solution in terms of ethical and religious behavior; In addition, students will be required to write five-one hundred-word essays on various themes drawing from the Biblical text and Rashi’s comments; One essay will require the student to demonstrate an ability to translate from Hebrew to English.

    Advanced Exodus I (BIB-310) will challenge the student’s knowledge of the entire Book of Exodus. It will include the Biblical text in Hebrew as well as Rashi’s commentary. Topics include Enslavement in Egypt, early life of Moses and his leadership role, Pharoah, the Ten Plagues, the Exodus, the splitting of the Red Sea, Children of Israel in the wilderness, the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai and the Ten Commandments, the Golden Calf and the Tabernacle. While most of the exam will be in English, students must be able to read and understand the Hebrew texts.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/22).

    Advanced Exodus II

    (BIB-410)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the concepts and themes found throughout the entire book of Exodus along with its medieval and modern commentaries; Students will be able to solve apparent contradictions in the verses and explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insight; Students will also explain legal rulings derived from the text found in major law books as well as interpret ethical issues which emerge from the text; In addition, students will be required to write five-one hundred-word essays connecting sources to a variety of themes using source material from the Chumash and selected commentaries; One essay will require the student to demonstrate an ability to translate from Hebrew to English.

    Advanced Exodus II (BIB-410) will assess the students’ knowledge of the Book of Exodus on an advanced level. Students will be required to have a broad knowledge of classical commentaries on the Book of Exodus including: The Talmud, Midrash, Rashi, Ramban, Sforno, and R’ Samson R. Hirsch among others. Students will have a deep understanding of how the commentators analyze the Bible, with a focus on philosophical and ethical principles derived from the verses. Topics include: the exile to Egypt, servitude in Egypt, the rise of Moses to leadership, the ten plagues, the splitting of the sea, the giving of the Torah and Ten Commandments, the building of the Tabernacle and more.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/22).

    Advanced Genesis I

    (BIB-300)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate knowledge of the text and commentary on the entire Book of Exodus. Mastery of the material will include the ability to analyze and explain select sections of the text along with Rashi’s commentary. This analysis will include identifying the textual problem Rashi is trying to resolve and how he resolves it. When relevant, students should also be able to explain Rashi’s solution in terms of ethical and religious behavior. In addition, students will be required to write five-one hundred-word essays on various themes drawing from the Biblical text and Rashi’s comments. One essay will require the student to demonstrate an ability to translate from Hebrew to English.

    Advanced Genesis I (BIB-300) will challenge the student’s knowledge of the entire Book of Exodus. It will include the Biblical text in Hebrew as well as Rashi’s commentary. Topics include Enslavement in Egypt, early life of Moses and his leadership role, Pharoah, the Ten Plagues, the Exodus, the splitting of the Red Sea, Children of Israel in the wilderness, the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai and the Ten Commandments, the Golden Calf and the Tabernacle. While most of the exam will be in English, students must be able to read and understand the Hebrew texts.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/22).

    Advanced Genesis II

    (BIB-400)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the concepts and themes found throughout the entire Book of Genesis along with its medieval and modern commentaries; Students will be able to solve apparent contradictions in the verses and explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insight; Students will also explain legal rulings derived from the text found in major law books as well as interpret ethical issues which emerge from the text; In addition, students will be required to write five-one hundred-word essays connecting sources to a variety of themes using source material from the Chumash and selected commentaries; One essay will require the student to demonstrate an ability to translate from Hebrew to English.

    Advanced Genesis II (BIB-400) will assess the students’ knowledge of the Book of Genesis on an advanced level. Students will be required to have a broad knowledge of classical commentaries on the Book of Genesis including: The Talmud, Midrash, Rashi, Ramban, Sforno, and R’ Samson R. Hirsch among others. Students will have a deep understanding of how the commentators analyze the Bible, with a focus on philosophical and ethical principles derived from the verses. Topics include: The purpose of Creation, the exile from Eden, Noah and the Ark, Abraham and the ten tests, the binding of Isaac, the selling of Josef, the exile to Egypt and more.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/22).

    Advanced Leviticas I

    (BIB-320)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate knowledge of the text and commentary on the entire Book of Leviticus; Mastery of the material will include the ability to analyze and explain select sections of the text along with Rashi’s commentary; This analysis will include identifying the textual problem Rashi is trying to resolve and how he resolves it. When relevant, students should also be able to explain Rashi’s solution in terms of ethical and religious behavior; In addition, student will be required to write a five-one hundred-word essays on various themes drawing from the Biblical text and Rashi’s comments; One essay will require the student to demonstrate an ability to translate from Hebrew to English.

    Advanced Leviticas I (BIB-320) will challenge the student’s knowledge of the entire Book of Leviticus. It will include the Biblical text in Hebrew as well as Rashi’s commentary. Topics include: Korbanos (Sacrifices), the death of Nadav and Avihu, Yom Kippur service in the Temple, laws of tzoras, laws of sexual relationships, kosher and non kosher animals, agricultural gifts to the poor, the Sabbatical year and Jubilee year, and laws of lending money. While most of the exam will be in English, students must be able to read and understand the Hebrew texts.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/22).

    Advanced Leviticas II

    (BIB-420)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the concepts and themes found throughout the entire book of Leviticus along with its medieval and modern commentaries; Students will be able to solve apparent contradictions in the verses and explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insight; Students will also explain legal rulings derived from the text found in major law books as well as interpret ethical issues which emerge from the text; In addition, students will be required to write five-one hundred-word essays connecting sources to a variety of themes using source material from the Chumash and selected commentaries; One essay will require the student to demonstrate an ability to translate from Hebrew to English.

    Advanced Leviticas II (BIB-420) will assess the students’ knowledge of the Book of Leviticus on an advanced level. Students will be required to have a broad knowledge of classical commentaries on the Book of Leviticus including: The Talmud, Midrash, Rashi, Ramban, Sforno, and R’ Samson R. Hirsch among others. Students will have a deep understanding of how the commentators analyze the Bible, with a focus on philosophical and ethical principles derived from the verses. Topics include Sacrifices, Priestly Service, Priestly blessings, and laws relating to Priests, kosher and non-kosher species, spiritual contamination, tzoras, and more. Suggestions for review: Students may rely on background knowledge and review any resources they wish to prepare for the exam.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/22).

    Advanced Numbers

    (BIB-430)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the concepts and themes found throughout the entire Book of Numbers along with its medieval and modern commentaries; solve apparent contradictions in the verses; explain the hermeneutic principles which are applied to verses to gain new insight; explain legal rulings derived from the text found in major law books; interpret ethical issues which emerge from the text; connect sources to a variety of themes using source material from the Chumash and selected commentaries; and translate Hebrew to English in written format.

    Advanced Numbers (BIB-430) will assess the students’ knowledge of the Book of Numbers on an advanced level. Students will be required to have a broad knowledge of classical commentaries on the Book of Numbers including: The Talmud, Midrash, Rashi, Ramban, Sforno, and R’ Samson R. Hirsch among others. Students will have a deep understanding of how the commentators analyze the Bible, with a focus on philosophical and ethical principles derived from the verses. Topics include: censuses, the laws of Nazir, rebellions, the encampment, laws of inheritance, laws of vows, the spies, Aaron’s death and more.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/22).

    Advanced Study of Blessings I

    (JST-315)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    November 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: assess the more complex details of the concepts and laws of blessings according to the halacha of the Jewish religion. Students will be required to identify and explain major points of disagreement among the early sources. In addition, students will be able to successfully apply major principles and individual details to various circumstances.

    Advanced Studies of Blessings I (JST 330) is a self-study course that culminates in a final examination. Students will become familiarized with the primary sources of halacha through Tur and Beis Yosef, gaining the ability to trace halacha to its source and identify the points of dispute among rishonim. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and sources for complex laws of brachos and the ability to apply their knowledge of the halachic principles of brachos to various situations and analyze what rules come into play in any given case. Topics will include the underlying meaning and reasons for blessings, dealing with cases of doubt, rules of saying “amen,” saying blessings on behalf of others, the proper sequence of blessings, and the criteria for which a blessing said on one item can exempt another item.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (10/20).

    Advanced Study of Blessings II

    (JST-320)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    November 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply the theories they have learned in the area of Jewish blessings and will assess basic concepts related to blessings; identify major principles; analyze the underlying premises of the principal laws and customs; and apply them to varied and novel situations.

    This is a distance learning course that covers blessing structure, blessings made in vain, the response of amen, discharging the obligation of others, initial blessings, sequence of blessings, principle versus subsidiary items, the status of staple foods, and the use of the general blessing of shehakol (the blessing recited over any food or drink that does not fall into a higher category of blessing).

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Anthropology, Judaic Studies, Sociology, or Religion (11/20).

    Ethics of the Fathers I

    (ETH-340)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: to identify the textual sources for Torah principles as found in Pirkei Avos; to show familiarity with the teachings of Pirkei Avos and the commentary of Rabbeinu Yonah; to apply the ethical principles of Pirkei Avos to various practical situations; to trace the transmission of the Torah; to recognize the relationship between the ethical teachings of Pirkei Avos and proper interpersonal relations; and to understand the beliefs of reward and punishment according to the sages of Pirkei Avos.

    Ethics of the Fathers I (ETH-340) is examines the ethical messages and teachings of the first three chapters of Tractate Avos along with the essential comments and teachings of Rabbeinu Yonah of Gerona in his commentary on those chapters. Students should know Rabbeinu Yonah’s explanations of the words of the mishnah and the concepts he derives from the mishnah. Concepts in this course involve understanding the transmission of tradition, good character traits, proper interpersonal relations, reward and punishment, and pure service of G-d.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Studies, Philosophy, History, Ethics, or Education (5/21).

    Ethics of the Fathers II

    (ETH-345)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: to identify the textual sources for Torah principles as found in Pirkei Avos; to show familiarity with the teachings of Pirkei Avos and the commentary of Rabbeinu Yonah; to apply the ethical principles of Pirkei Avos to various practical situations; to elaborate the attitudes towards wisdom and how to attain it as expressed in Pirkei Avos; to recognize the relationship between the ethical teachings of Pirkei Avos and proper interpersonal relations; and to understand the beliefs of reward and punishment according to the sages of Pirkei Avos.

    Ethics of the Fathers II (ETH-345) is a course which examines the ethical messages and teachings of the last three chapters of Tractate Avos along with the essential comments and teachings of Rabbeinu Yonah of Gerona in his commentary on those chapters. Students should know Rabbeinu Yonah’s explanations of the words of the mishnah and the concepts he derives from the mishnah. Concepts addressed in this course involve defining a Torah value system, ethical character traits, ethical attitudes towards Torah study, how to successfully pursue wisdom, and reward and punishment.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Studies, Philosophy, History, Ethics, or Education (5/21).

    Ethics of Wealth

    (ETH-400)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain why the Sages of the Talmud viewed financial self-sufficiency as a crucial value; assess and prioritize competing values in the area of money and wealth according to rabbinic scholarship; describe the relationship between trust in G-d and pursuit of livelihood; identify varying aspects of financial planning and their significance within the framework of Torah money ethics; evaluate various career options and their suitability according to Torah ethical teaching; evaluate how financial matters impact on a person’s character; identify the dangers of both poverty and wealth; and discern how financial life is replete with mitzvos and Divine guidance.

    Ethics of Wealth (ETH-400) is a course which explores Torah values and ethics regarding money, wealth and work. Utilizing traditional sources from the Bible, Talmud, and their classic commentaries as well later rabbinic sources, the course will consider topics such as financial self-sufficiency and its significance, financial planning and investing, as well as vocational and professional options for employment. It will also examine how issues relating to money play a role in mitzvah observance and personal character.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Studies, Philosophy, History, Ethics, or Education (5/21).

    Exodus I

    (BIB-101)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    November 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to demonstrate measurable higher-level thinking skill of the text and selected commentary of Rashi on the first half of the Book of Exodus (chapters 1-17). Included in this will be the ability to identify the correct English interpretation of Hebrew words and phrases in the Book of Exodus. Students will also be able to analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi’s commentary, be able to elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics, identify from where in the text Rashi derived his interpretation, and explain the significance of Rashi’s solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior. Students will be able to do this analysis even on comments of Rashi that are not given on the list of selections.

    This distance learning course covers the first half of the Book of Exodus (chapter 1-17, consisting of Parshiyot Shemos through Beshalach) and selected commentaries of Rashi. Topics include the birth and development of Moshe, Egyptian slavery, the ten plagues, the exodus, the korban pesach (the sacrifice slaughtered and eaten on the first eve of Passover) and other commandments given to remember the exodus, the splitting of the Red Sea, and the mann (food from heaven) and the quail which Bnei Yisrael (the Israelites) ate in the desert.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/20).

    Exodus II

    (BIB-102)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    November 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to demonstrate measurable higher-level thinking skill of the text and selected commentary of Rashi on the second half of the Book of Exodus (chapters 18-40). Included in this will be the ability to identify the correct English interpretation of Hebrew words and phrases in the Book of Exodus. Students will also be able to analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi’s commentary, be able to elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics, identify from where in the text Rashi derived his interpretation, and explain the significance of Rashi’s solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior. Students will be able to do this analysis even on comments of Rashi that are not given on the list of selections.

    This is a distance learning course that covers the second half of the Book of Exodus (chapters 18-40, consisting of Parshiot – Yisro through Pekudei) and selected commentaries of Rashi. Topics include the visit of Yisro, the giving of the Torah, the civil laws of Mishpatim, the construction of the mishkan (tabernacle), the sin of the golden calf, and the subsequent forgiveness.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/20).

    Genesis I

    (BIB-103)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    November 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of the text and selected commentary of Rashi on the first half of the Book of Genesis (1:1-25:18). Included in this will be the ability to identify the correct English interpretation of Hebrew words and phrases in the Book of Genesis. Students will also be able to analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi’s commentary, be able to elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics, identify from where in the text Rashi derived his interpretation, and explain the significance of Rashi’s solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior. Students will be able to do this analysis even on comments of Rashi that are not given on the list of selections.

    This self-study course covers the first half of the Book of Genesis (1:1-25:18, consisting of Parshiot Breishis through Chayei Sarah) and selected commentaries of Rashi. Topics include the Creation, the exile from Eden, the first fratricide, the generations of the Great Flood and the Tower of Bavel, Abraham and Sarah and their relationship with G-d, the destruction of Sodom the binding of Isaac, and the selection of Rivkah.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/20).

    Genesis II

    (BIB-104)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    November 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the text and selected commentary of Rashi on the second half of the Book of Genesis (25:19-50:25). Included in this will be the ability to identify the correct English interpretation of Hebrew words and phrases in the Book of Genesis. Students will also be able to analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi’s commentary, be able to elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics, identify from where in the text Rashi derived his interpretation, and explain the significance of Rashi’s solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior. Students will be able to do this analysis even on comments of Rashi that are not given on the list of selections.

    This distance learning course covers the second half of the Book of Genesis (25:19-50:25), consisting of Parshiyot Toldos through Vayechi, and selected commentaries of Rashi. Topics include the life of Yitzchak, the rivalry between Yaakov and Eisav, Yaakov’s experience with Lavan, the development of the 12 tribes, and Yosef as a leader in Egypt.

    In In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/20).

    Laws of Blessings

    (JST-225)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    November 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply the theories they have learned in the area of Jewish blessings and will assess basic concepts related to blessings; identify major principles; analyze the underlying premises of the principal laws and customs; and apply them to varied and novel situations.

    This is a distance learning course that covers blessing structure, blessings made in vain, the response of amen, discharging the obligation of others, initial blessings, sequence of blessings, principle versus subsidiary items, the status of staple foods, and the use of the general blessing of shehakol (the blessing recited over any food or drink that does not fall into a higher category of blessing).

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Anthropology, Judaic Studies, Sociology, or Religion (11/20).

    Leviticus

    (BIB-105)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    November 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, Students will be able to demonstrate measurable higher-level thinking skill of the text and selected commentary of Rashi on the first half of the Book of Leviticus. Included in this is the ability to identify the correct English interpretation of Hebrew words and phrases in the Book of Leviticus. Students will also be able to analyze and explain selections of text and Rashi’s commentary, be able to elucidate the inconsistency or textual problem that Rashi is attempting to solve based on his use of hermeneutics, identify from where in the text Rashi derived his interpretation, and explain the significance of Rashi’s solutions in terms of ethical and religious behavior. Students will be able to identify the textual issue bothering Rashi even on comments of Rashi that are not given on the list of selections.

    This distance learning course covers the Book of Leviticus. The entire text of Leviticus and selected commentaries of Rashi are covered. Although most of the exam is in English, students must be able to read and explain the Hebrew text. Some of the main topics included are korbanos (offerings), the death of Nadav and Avihu, the Yom Kippur service, the kohen gadol (high priest), the laws of tzara’as (leprosy) and other types of impurity, kosher and non-kosher animals, the Jewish holidays, agricultural gifts for the poor, the sabbatical year and the jubilee year.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (11/20).

    The History of Orthodox Jewry in the United States (1880-1945)

    (HIS-460)

    $300.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies / History


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss the history of the Orthodox Jews in America from 1880-1945; describe the challenges Jewish immigrants faced as they encountered American culture and society, and in particular the challenge of material abundance; understand both the obstacles that caused Jews to weaken in religious commitment as well as the various methods and institutions which worked to preserve tradition; outline the accomplishments of Orthodox Jews in different aspects of American society; develop a deep understanding of the causes and manifestations of anti-Semitism during this period and relations between Jews and gentiles; understand Orthodox Jewish immigrant relations with previously established Jewish groups; and forecast the behavior of typical immigrants under various circumstances and draw parallels from leaders, methods, and ideas of those times to apply them to other similar circumstances.

    The History of Orthodox Jewry in the United States (1880-1945) (HIS-460) will assess the student’s knowledge of the history of Orthodox Jewry in the United States and the challenges they faced, primarily from the years 1880-1945, focusing on the influx of Russian immigrants and how they confronted American society, as well as their relations with the Jews who had arrived in the U.S. previously. It deals with the challenges of material abundance and various threats to religious life and details the variety of major steps taken by the Orthodox community to preserve Torah traditions. It also provides context on various types of anti-Semitic movements that arose at this time and important Jewish social and political leaders and legislation as it related to the Jews, as well as the varied American Jewish responses to the holocaust and the accompanying refugee crisis.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Jewish History, or as a General Elective (2/22).

    The Jewish Woman in Medieval Society

    (SOC 335)

    $300.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies / Sociology


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: demonstrate a broad and in-depth knowledge of the role of Jewish women in medieval society in both Ashkenazic and Sephardic countries; describe the typical woman’s social and economic status, as well as religious activity, and explain differences based on place of residence; become familiar with the approach of various scholars in the field and the social causes they suggest to explain some of the practices and decrees which were made during this time period; and make conclusions about how the Jewish woman in the Middle Ages viewed herself and how others saw her.

    The Jewish Woman in Medieval Society (SOC-335) will assess the student’s knowledge of the role of the Jewish woman in Jewish society in the Middle Ages. This includes their economic standing and their typical level of education, involvement in the community and in religious practice. It will also deal with the reasons for various rabbinical ordinances decreed during this time which relate to women. The course cover major life events such as choosing a spouse, marriage, childrearing, and divorce to understand how the status of women was affected by the way these things were done in this time period, and how social conditions, in turn, had an effect in changing some aspects of these events. Ultimately, a broad picture will appear of how the Jewish woman viewed herself in the Middle Ages and how she was viewed by others.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, Religion, or as General Elective (2/22).

    Trees and Plants of the Torah

    (BIB-376)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: to identify the main references to plants and trees in the Torah; to recognize the Torah prohibitions and commandments involving trees and plants; to understand the symbolism of trees in general and certain individual trees and plants according to rabbinical interpretation from the times of the midrash until current times; to be able to demonstrate how knowledge of passages in the Torah involving trees and plants provides guidance in life and spiritual growth; to apply the rabbinic symbolism of trees and plants to additional Biblical, Talmudic, or Midrashic passages or scenarios involving those trees and plants; and to apply the rabbinic symbolism of trees and plants to create messages relevant to current issues in life and spiritual growth.

    Trees and Plants of the Torah (BIB-376) is an advanced Bible course which examines the relevance of trees and plants in the Torah. This is to include not only the explicit references to trees and plants, such as the mitzvos of orlah, shmitah, and bikurim, but also the symbolic significance of trees as interpreted by the rabbis from the composers of the midrash through current times. A major focus will be to understand how Torah scholars over the generations have learned lessons for the man’s daily life and spiritual growth from the metaphorical example of the trees in the Torah, both in lessons from trees in general and from specific types of trees and plants, such as the grapevine and the olive tree. Some of the specific topics will include analysis of the trees of the Garden of Eden, the Burning Bush, and the apple orchard referenced in Yitzchak’s blessing of Eisav.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Bible Studies, Judaic Studies, or Religion (5/21).