Home » Page » Sociology

We offer distance learning courses that are recommended for college credit by the NCCRS in the following subjects:

Sociology

    A Social History of Jewish Food

    (SOC-302)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Sociology


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate a broad and intensive knowledge of Jewish food practices from Biblical times through present day, inclusive of Ashekenazic and Sephardic customs as well as current American and Israeli food; explain the religious and symbolic reasons for special festival foods, unique weekday foods, and food taboos; compare and contrast the differences between Jewish cultures and reasons for food variety; identify patterns in factors that affect Jewish food choices; and discuss various definitions and opinions of what is considered Jewish food.

    This self-study course assess students’ knowledge of the social history of Jewish food, including Biblical and Talmudic concepts and rules of food and customs that have been adopted over the centuries in Jewish settlements in the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and more recently in the United States and Israel. Major topics include: how foods are used for ritual and festival purposes, how Jews played a role in spreading foods to other cultures, and modern attitudes of Jews toward different types of cuisine and different reasons for their food choices and the respective sociologically significance.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, Religion, Nutritional Science, or as General Elective (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).

    Environmental Sociology

    (SOC-345)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Sociology


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: identify core concepts, theories, and perspectives in the study of environmental sociology; critically analyze the reciprocal relationship between human society and the natural environment; critically view and analyze environmental problems associated within contemporary society; and discuss changes in the natural environment through a sociological perspective.

    Environmental Sociology (SOC-345) is designed to introduce students to the sub-discipline of environmental sociology. Throughout the semester, students explore the interactions between the natural and the human-built environment and discuss factors of human society that have caused the degradation of ecological systems. In order to understand contemporary environmental problems, students must critically look at the values and priorities of a society that drive human actions. Other topics include exploring how social movements have emerged in response to environmental degradation as well as motivations and measures individuals, groups, and nations can curb and/or prevent further environmental degradation.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Environmental Sociology (2/22).

    Introduction to Sociology

    (SOC-103)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    September 2013 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Sociology


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the history of Sociology as a field; identify the manner in which sociological research is conducted; consider ethical and social ramifications when conducting sociological research; define culture and diversity and relate those two concepts to each other; determine the interaction between human nature and socialization and the effect that they have on one another in various contexts; characterize societal institutions on the macro and micro levels; ascertain the role of technology on society and human interaction; detail the effects of mass media on socialization; identify the roles of social groups and organizations on human society and interaction; and analyze the role of deviance from societal norms on society and discuss the social control of deviant behavior that is exercised by society.

    This self-study course in Sociology is designed for students with no prior background in the subject and guides students through the process of asking and answering important questions from a sociological perspective. Students exercise critical thinking, reading, and writing skills while being exposed to sociological theories and research they can apply to important social issues. Students learn how individuals are organized into social groups from intimate groups to bureaucracies and how these influence individual behavior, considering the nature and interrelationships of basic social institutions such as family, education, religion, and the economy.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology (9/13)(8/18 revalidation).

    Jewish Clothing in History, Society, and Thought

    (SOC-305)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Sociology


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: trace the historical development of Jewish dress from its sources to current practice; identify historical articles of clothing for their significance in the wearer’s life and in historical context; counsel someone who is interested in assembling authentic style accoutrements of a Jewish wardrobe for a specific ethnic group from a certain time; identify symbolism used on Jewish clothing and its significance; explain how external decrees helped shape the Jewish wardrobe historically and continue to leave lingering effects today; describe the standards of modesty suggested by current Orthodox Jewish authorities and the reasons behind them; define what Orthodox Jews mean by “Jewish” clothing and how it relates to clothing worn by Jews throughout history; and connect clothing practices across different Jewish cultures to shared underlying concepts.

    This course provides students with an understanding of the development and identity of clothing of the Jewish people, beginning with the Biblical commands that involve clothing and many of the references to dress in the Bible and what they signify. Major topics include: the history of clothing used by Jews for special life-cycle events along with social explanations for these practices, the history of governmental decrees on Jewish apparel, both for Jews living under the Muslims and the Christians, the history of uniquely Jewish fashion, split between the Sephardic and the Ashkenazic lands. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology or Judaic Studies (4/19).

    Social Ethics

    (SOC-104)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Sociology


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify and describe the classic and current theories of ethics; construct an ethical system; apply ethical approaches to various scenarios and moral dilemmas; identify major issues in environmental, business, medicine, and media ethics; describe the main issues surrounding the ethics of taking human life in specific circumstances such as suicide or euthanasia; discuss key ethical arguments in the controversy over abortion rights; present various approaches to the morality of lying, cheating, stealing, and sexual promiscuity; and look at ethical dilemmas in the news through the lens of various ethical approaches.

    This course discusses the theory and practice of ethics from the basics of the nature of morality and the classic and more recent theories of morality to their applications in current issues of controversy. Major topics include: procedure for setting up a moral system, ethical issues related to the value of human life, where questions arise in matters such as abortion, suicide, and mercy death.
    Additional topics include: ethical issues in medicine, business, media, and environment by examining the moral dilemmas as well as the status of major questions in current dialogue and law.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology or Ethics (8/18).

    Sociology of the Ba’al Teshuva Movement

    (SOC-303)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2014 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Sociology


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the Ba’al Teshuva movement; explain how the Ba’al Teshuva enter the movement and their typical socialization process; recognize the social challenges faced by the basic Ba’al Teshuva and the nuances which continue to identify the Ba’al Teshuva from the rest of the community; and discuss how this movement may impact the future of the Orthodox community.

    This proficiency examination assesses students’ knowledge of the Ba’al Teshuva movement which began in the second half of the Twentieth century as Jews returned to Orthodoxy and includes the perceived socio-historic challenges which the movement overcame, as well as those socio-historic factors which supported its development. At the completion of the course, students will be able to relate the entry points to the movement, such as synagogues and Ba’al Teshuva institutions of study, discuss the challenges of recruitment, describe how the Ba’al Teshuva tends to adapt to Orthodox culture and focus on which aspects pose special challenges, describe the cultural stigmas that the Ba’al Teshuva carries in the Orthodox community and how such stigma can be dealt with and explore the impact that the Ba’al Teshuva movement has had on the general Orthodox community. The proficiency examination also evaluates students’ knowledge of the history, meaning, and social nuances of the Ba’al Teshuva movement, as well as the sociological terminologies associated with explaining it.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Religious Studies, Judaic Studies, Anthropology, or Jewish History (4/14).

    The Jewish Child in Traditional Jewish Society

    (SOC-101)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    May 2013 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate a broad and in-depth knowledge of traditional Jewish attitudes towards children and child-rearing from Biblical, Talmudic, medieval, and contemporary times; explain various traditional Jewish conceptions of childhood and parenting and their sources, educational approaches, methods of socialization, and views about individuality; describe how Jewish children have been uniquely affected during specific times of persecution; cite appropriate examples of how youth movements and modern social tendencies have impacted traditional Judaism in more recent times; and identify ways in which recent traditional authorities deal with current realities in their suggestions for child-rearing practices.

    This self-study assesses students’ knowledge of the role of the child in traditional Jewish society. Students study the Biblical and Talmudic attitude towards children and child-rearing as well as some sources from Medieval times and how contemporary traditional authorities approach the subject within the contemporary milieu. Specific topics include: methods of socialization, educational approaches and the relationship between child and parent and what obligations each one is considered to have towards the other, and the level of individuality that should be encouraged. Special attention is focused on understanding how children played a specific and unique role in various times of persecution as well as the influence of youth movements in more recent times with relation to the general Jewish society. Students will also discuss contemporary challenges, particularly the problem of at-risk youth in the traditional community.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religion, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, or as a General Elective (6/13)(8/18 revalidation).

    The Jewish Woman in Medieval Society

    (SOC 335)

    $300.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Judaic Studies / Sociology


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: demonstrate a broad and in-depth knowledge of the role of Jewish women in medieval society in both Ashkenazic and Sephardic countries; describe the typical woman’s social and economic status, as well as religious activity, and explain differences based on place of residence; become familiar with the approach of various scholars in the field and the social causes they suggest to explain some of the practices and decrees which were made during this time period; and make conclusions about how the Jewish woman in the Middle Ages viewed herself and how others saw her.

    The Jewish Woman in Medieval Society (SOC-335) will assess the student’s knowledge of the role of the Jewish woman in Jewish society in the Middle Ages. This includes their economic standing and their typical level of education, involvement in the community and in religious practice. It will also deal with the reasons for various rabbinical ordinances decreed during this time which relate to women. The course cover major life events such as choosing a spouse, marriage, childrearing, and divorce to understand how the status of women was affected by the way these things were done in this time period, and how social conditions, in turn, had an effect in changing some aspects of these events. Ultimately, a broad picture will appear of how the Jewish woman viewed herself in the Middle Ages and how she was viewed by others.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, Religion, or as General Elective (2/22).