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We offer distance learning courses that are recommended for college credit by the NCCRS in the following subjects:

Education Courses

    Analyzing Children’s Literature

    (ECE-304)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze children’s literature through multiple literary elements; compare various genres within children’s literature; articulate interpretations and discuss deeper meanings within children’s literature; identify ideologies within children’s literature; employ rhetorical modes to develop and write a literary analysis; and discuss themes in children’s literature, including: social differences, family relations, independence, and others.

    This course explores a wide selection of children’s literature. Students examine the impact children’s literature has had on various generations. Major topics include: genres such as children’s classics, poetry, realistic fiction, folk and fairy tales, gender issues, and realism versus fantasy. Students take a deeper look at the stories they read as children and use literary elements such as themes, symbolism, characterization, and plot to analyze works written for children.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Children’s Literature, Early Childhood Education, or Elementary Education (8/18).

    Applied Behavior Analysis for Early Learners

    (EDU-380)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the goals of behavior analysis as a science: description, prediction, and control; explain the philosophical assumptions underlying behavior analysis: selectionism, determinism, parsimony, and pragmatism; define critical concept related human psychological development and provide specific examples; explain the role of assessment in applied behavior analysis; evaluate procedures for assessing the social significance of target behaviors; analyze the measurable dimensions of behavior; identify and describe the elements of useful scientific measurement; create and evaluate appropriate graphic representations of behavioral data; systematically manipulate independent variables and analyze their effects on treatment; study the effects of various independent variables using the reversal design, multi-element design, and their variants; compare and contrast positive and negative reinforcement and their application in a classroom setting; investigate behavior analytic perspectives on punishment as a behavior analytical technology; identify methods of implementing different behavior interventions; define “concept” and describe how stimulus generalization and discrimination contribute to concept formation; classify intraverbals by simple, compound, conditional, and function altering verbal biases and reinforcers controlling the response; describe ways that behavioral organizations can create a culture of ethical practice; and analyze instructional tactics for promoting generalized behavior change.

    Applied Behavior Analysis for Early Learners (EDU-380) teaches participants foundational concepts related to the social behavior and interactions of children and explains strategies for analyzing and managing relationships with students. Course participants examine factors that influence human behavior and the development of children’s social identities. They also learn about research-based methods for analyzing student behavior and supporting the behavioral development of children. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to provide participants with a firm foundation of the principles of child psychology and behavioral development. Course participants gain critical knowledge and understanding of human behavior and managing student relationships. Additionally, participants explore strategies for nurture developmentally appropriate behaviors and attitudes in early learning environments.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Applied Behavior Analysis or Education (5/21).

    Assessing Students with Special Needs

    (EDU-340)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: create effective plans for implementing social studies lessons in the elementary classroom; explain social studies education in regard to curriculum patterns, classroom environments, and roles of the teacher; investigate the role of democracy and citizenship in social studies education; describe strategies that promote a culturally responsive learning environment; explain how curriculum standards may be applied to the social studies disciplines; describe learner-, society-, and knowledge-centered approaches to organize a social studies curriculum; explain how social, emotional, cultural, and educational factors interact to influence English language development in school; analyze the sequential progress of lessons directed toward the development of a theme in an effective unit; identify direct and indirect instructional strategies that are used in effective learning environments; investigate authentic assessments that improve teaching and learning; describe strategies to improve metacognition and inquiry in the social studies classroom; describe how to differentiate instruction to meet the varied needs of English learners; synthesize a variety of projects that can be incorporated in an interdisciplinary unit of study; describe how students can become map-makers rather than map-readers; explain the importance of studying history; describe strategies that promote literacy in social studies curriculum; identify the keys to reflective thinking.

    Assessing Students with Special Needs (EDU-340) will teach participants strategies and best practices for teaching social studies to elementary students. Course participants will examine instructional strategies that promote citizenship. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to develop the skills that are necessary the skills that are necessary to effectively deliver social studies education to elementary students. Students will gain a deeper understanding of instructional strategies and tools for classroom application. Additionally, students will explore strategies for developing lessons and units that align with district, state, and national standards.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Special Education or Education (5/21).

    Assessment in Early Childhood Education

    (ECE-310)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: explain the purposes of assessment in early childhood and how infants and young children are assessed; describe elements of a comprehensive assessment system for children of all ages; explain how assessment results are used for instruction and to evaluate the instructional program; discuss how the assessment process should be implemented during the school year with school-age children; describe how test scores are reported and how and when they should be shared with parents; evaluate the pros and cons of standardized testing as well as other types of objective assessments; assist in ensuring the development and maintenance of checklists, rating scales, and rubrics; describe the types of assessments used with preschool and primary-grade children; assist in the crafting of quality portfolio assessment systems; and describe model portfolio assessment and reporting systems.

    This exam serves as an introduction to assessment in early childhood settings. Various means of assessment (i.e. formative, summative, authentic, traditional, etc.) when implemented properly can enhance the quality of instruction and enhance students’ learning.  The material included in this course is designed increase students’ understanding of the critical role valid and reliable classroom assessment has in supporting learning in the classroom.  Additionally, students explore how to evaluate assessment data for instructional decision-making.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).

    Classroom Management

    (EDU-300)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: examine the main objectives of a classroom management system and create an effective plan for managing a classroom environment; investigate themes from historical approaches to management that are still prevalent in the field today; compare the relevance of important classroom management terminologies and identify ways in which teachers can help students comprehend expectations; compare and contrast the classroom management recommendations made by leading theorists and experts in classroom management; analyze and evaluate student characteristics that may affect classroom management; evaluate classroom management plans and decisions; interpret the PBIS framework and the broad classroom management themes to which it corresponds; examine issues of diversity and how they impact classroom management and building meaningful relationships with students and their families.

    Major topics include: an introduction to the essential elements and principles of classroom management, including behavior, motivation, discipline, communication, and engagement strategies. Students will also learn a variety of classroom management skills, that can be used establish organized and engaging classroom environments and establish positive and cooperative relationships with children and their parents/guardians using the developmentally appropriate classroom management strategies.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Classroom Management or Education (4/20).

    Creative Arts in the Classroom

    (ECE-350)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: examine the contributions of creativity and imagination to the total learning of the child; understand the scope and social and personal impact of the fine arts; explore methods of helping children discover the fine arts through practical experiences, materials, and museum experiences; promote understanding and appreciation of other cultures through research about prominent artists from various cultures, both globally and within the United States; and create and use an understanding of the arts and aesthetics in integrating the arts into other disciplines in the elementary curriculum.

    This exam supports students as they examine children’s creative expression and critical thinking through art, drama, and music. Exam content reflects contemporary theory and practice and promotes ideas and skills that tap children’s propensity for creativity and critical thinking. Numerous strategies of arts integration and examples of learning content through the visual arts, music, dance, and poetry are discussed.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).

    Cultural Diversity in the Classroom

    (EDU-330)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain the key concepts of diversity and the purpose of studying diversity; analyze the frameworks for illustrating cultural identity; identify teaching strategies to promote positive responses to diversity; explain race from sociopolitical and historical perspectives; identify successful approaches to supporting linguistically diverse children; investigate the potential for challenges and resiliency connected to socioeconomic status; evaluate strategies for support children from lower SES backgrounds; explain the context of religions and spirituality within families, schools, and across the United States; describe demographic contexts and diverse family structures; explain concepts of ability and disability in a historical and social context; identify the responsibilities of professionals in meeting all children’s needs in program and school settings; synthesize evidence-based decisions that inform culturally and individually relevant practice; and evaluate instructional strategies that support diverse learners.

    Cultural Diversity in the Classroom (EDU-330) will teach participants strategies for teaching with through the lens of culturally responsive pedagogy. Course participants will examine instructional strategies for teaching diverse populations. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to develop the cultural competency skills that are necessary to engage students with diverse background. Students will gain a deeper understanding of important differences among students, and strengths within families, communities, and programs. Additionally, students will explore strategies for making instructional decisions that reflect culturally responsive pedagogy.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education (5/21).

    Early Childhood Curriculum

    (ECE-301)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: describe the characteristics of early childhood programs and describe the steps generally necessary to plan and apply developmentally appropriate practices; discuss the responsibilities of early childhood professionals and how they facilitate learning through effective lesson planning and group placement; describe how program quality depends on the development of differentiated instructional approaches to meet students’ needs; and evaluate the importance of building communication skills to communicate effectively with parents and coworkers.

    This exam explores early childhood organizational plans, procedures, physical facilities and surveys appropriate materials and equipment. Emphasis is placed on the process of designing appropriate learning environments for young children and an integrated, developmental approach to curriculum and instruction in the early childhood education. The exam covers all aspects of classroom life, the roles of children and adults in education, the physical and social environments, and the multiple developmental domains for children in early childhood education and provides a collaborative approach to curriculum development in early childhood education.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).

    Elementary Math Education

    (EDU-400)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: interpret the factors that influence the effective teaching of mathematics; investigate what it means to do mathematics; contrast and describe approaches to problem solving; compare and contrast the features of a three-phase lesson plan format for problem-based lessons; differentiate between formative and summative assessment; differentiate between a modification and an accommodation; illustrate how teaching mathematics to very young children involves providing high quality number activities using a developmental approach; demonstrate how to develop children’s skills in generalizing the problem structures with additive situations involving joining, separating, part-part-whole, and comparison where the unknown can be in any position; investigate the interplay addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division and effective use of computational strategies to solve problems; exhibit the essential features of fraction and ratio, including how they are interrelated, and articulate ways to help students understand and be able to use both; analyze the measurement process, including the identification and use of nonstandard and standard units, and demonstrate how to estimate measurements; differentiate the four major geometry goals for students.

    Major topics include: an introduction to concepts related to effective math instruction for elementary school students, various means of teaching foundational math concepts related to number sense, math mathematical operations, problem-solving strategies, integers, fractions, decimals, ratios, algebraic thinking, geometric conceptualization, and measurement, strategies for integrated math across other disciplines, incorporating culturally responsive teaching methods, and effective methods for developing math competency.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Elementary Education (4/20).

    Elementary Science

    (EDU-315)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: paraphrase that science is observing, analyzing, and investigating to learn how the natural and physical world works; establish learning goals that are aligned to standards identify what students should know, understand, and be able to do at their grade level; illustrate how designing a positive classroom environment is essential to promote active inquiry learning; demonstrate how understanding science ideas means being able to explain, to interpret, to apply and adapt knowledge; demonstrate how inquiry-based instruction features practices needed to ask and try to answer a scientific question; illustrate how asking the right question is at the heart of teaching and learning; investigate how assessment processes provide opportunities to gather evidence of student learning (summative) or for student learning (formative) which can be evaluated to determine level of mastery of the identified learning goals; investigate how technology can be used support learning in the science classroom; demonstrate how science doesn’t happen in isolation but is connected to mathematics when the learning goals from each discipline and the student practice skills from both disciplines are linked; and scrutinize how equity, diversity, and achievement gaps should be considered when guiding all children to learn science.

    Major topics include: an introduction to concepts related to effective science instruction for elementary school students, including the nature of science, inquiry-based instruction, effective learning environments, teaching for understanding, using the 5E engagement model, and questioning strategies, strategies for integrated science across other disciplines by incorporating technology.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Elementary Education (4/20)

    Family-Centered Early Education

    (ECE-230)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: assist in the creation of a program where learning, caring, and parental collaboration exists; interact with students from diverse backgrounds; develop a culturally sensitive partnership between home and school that encourages various methods of volunteering; assist in the development of policies that foment a culturally and linguistically appropriate ecology that encourages learning; and describe historical development of views on children and how those views affect family life.

    This exam provides the guidelines for creating effective partnerships with families. It provides an overview of the diversity of modern families. The emphasis is on examining elements that create successful partnerships and programs that work. Best practices suggest that when communities, schools, and families work together, the results are stronger communities that support the success of young people. The challenges that schools face today in fostering true parental engagement are the result of a multitude of complex issues. In completion of this course, students will have completed an in-depth study of ways schools are successfully meeting the parent-school connection challenge. Students also explore and adapt strategies to create that connection in ways that meet the specific needs of various schools and communities.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).

    Foundations of Education

    (EDU-501)

    $225.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    September 2016 – Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the causes of the increased professionalization of teaching in the United States today and the ramifications of this phenomenon; link educational philosophies to applied educational practices; describe the development of American education and the factors that have influenced it, from roots in classical western civilization through the current times; compare and contrast different theories of education, curriculum and instruction, and apply them; apply principles of multicultural education to classroom instruction; identify at-risk behaviors and proper responses to such behaviors; and identify methods that can decrease or remove racial, ethnic or gender gaps in education.

    Foundations of American Education is a graduate-level course providing a broad study of the philosophical and social foundations of education in the United States. Students become proficient in terminologies, educational theories, practice and legislation relevant to the American educational system. Students link previously developed educational ideas to present practices and compare and contrast the benefits and deficiencies of the applications of these ideas.  After being exposed to this information, students should be able to implement these theories into practice. In addition to taking a final examination on the course content, students are required to write two research papers on assigned topics and must successfully complete both of these assignments in order to receive credit recommendations.

    In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education (9/16).

    Health and Safety in Early Childhood Education

    (ECE-303)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe how basic physical health, mental health, nutrition, and safety needs influence the growth and development of young children and explain how policies support those needs; implement and evaluate research-based basic health, safety, and nutritional practices and enact strategies for encouraging the of practice safe behaviors for students in the classroom and in their communities; explain and identify ways to maintain the health, safety, and wellness of young children including: identifying hazards and risks; conducting regular health and safety assessments consistent with regulations and quality standards; reporting child abuse; and taking corrective action when necessary; identify signs, symptoms, and emergency treatment options of childhood diseases and those which might indicate physical, sexual, and psychological abuse or neglect, and analyze the impact of stress and trauma on children, families, and the broader community; identify and describe first aid procedures, emergency response procedures, recordkeeping, communication processes, and related legal, ethical, and policy issues related to medical services to families and co-workers; explain ways to create culturally responsive, nutrition plans and identify strategies supportive of collaboration with families and health professionals in meeting children’s individual health and nutritional needs; provide examples of effective health and immunization record-keeping systems; recognize, document, and report child maltreatment, and methods for caring for an abused child; explain the importance that stable, responsive, and consistent caregiving and good communication has on providing children with an optimum environment for good mental health; identify and describe culturally responsive strategies for engaging with families and communities to preserve the health, safety, and wellness of young children.

    This course is designed to provide early childhood educators with the knowledge and skills needed to engage in developmentally appropriate practices in health promotion, wellness, and safety for young children from diverse backgrounds and abilities levels within the context of the school, family, and community. Topics include: physical and mental health, nutrition, safety, communication, and record-keeping.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Children’s Health, Children’s Safety, or Children’s Mental Health (8/18).

    Inclusion: Effective Practices for all Students

    (ECE-355)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define inclusive education and its importance as an educational practice; critically analyze the foundations of inclusive education its historical trends, current practices, and emerging challenges; compare and contrast various special learning needs and how those needs influence instructional strategies employed by the teacher; explain how collaboration and teaming can be used to more effectively implement best practices in inclusive education; and describe the critical factors associated with creating a classroom environment that facilitates effective content area instruction, behavior management, and assessment of student learning.

    This course teaches participants how to create an inclusive learning environment that meets the needs of all learners. Course participants develop an understanding of current best practices, historical trends, and emerging challenges related to educating students with diverse learning needs. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to engage course participants in critical thought in order to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are necessary for the participant to meet the needs of all learners in their classrooms. Students gain a deeper understanding of the foundations of inclusion and the elements of effective inclusive education and explore the importance of curricula and proper assessment strategies in meeting the individualized needs of students with diverse learning needs.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Music and Movement (8/18).

    Infant and Toddler Development and Care

    (ECE-325)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze the programs that serve infants, toddlers, and families, the importance of a knowledgeable professional, and how to apply the relationship-based approach; describe implications for families and teachers in the diversity of family structures; explain the meaning of relationship-based theory, transactional and unified theory, biological systems theory, and ecobiodevelopmental theory; describe the major points of emotional and social development theories; explain how observation is a part of the assessment and the different types of assessment strategies; investigate the development of the fetus through the third trimester; explain the history and importance of attachment relationships and emotional learning and the effects of maternal depression; identify aspects of knowing the child—social development: communication, play, prosocial behavior, and conflict with peers and special needs; analyze how infants and toddlers develop cognitively within relationships, including cultural influences, the approaches to learning, the concepts they learn, and strategies to support learning; describe the basic policies and procedures necessary to keep infants and toddlers in group care safe and healthy; explain how to create a family and culturally sensitive program; create a responsive, relationship-based environment, including quality learning spaces, equipment, toys, and materials; analyze strategies and programs that are effective with children who exhibit challenging behavior and experience mental health issues; analyze how early development and learning programs can be effective in natural environments; evaluate key aspects of being an infant-toddler teacher, including the nature of the relationships with children, families, colleagues, and yourself; explain the elements of a relationship-based, reflective program, including the 3R approach (respect, reflect, and relate), reflective supervision, and mentoring and being mentored.

    Infant and Toddler Development and Care (ECE-325) teaches participants strategies and best practices for infant and toddler development and care. Course participants examine factors that influence the emotional and social development of infants and toddlers. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to effectively develop the necessary skills students need to understand and promote learning for infants and toddlers. Students study and examine the theories, program models, and developmentally appropriate practices for students in early learning. Additionally, students explore basic policies and procedures necessary to keep infants and toddlers in group care safe, healthy, and developing.

    In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Early Childhood Studies (5/21).

    Introduction to Early Childhood Education

    (ECE-210)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: describe and distinguish between the theories that influence early childhood programs and various philosophies of early childhood education; define early childhood education the professional behaviors that are associated with early childhood education; demonstrate understanding of early learning theories, program models and developmentally appropriate practices; and develop strategies for communicating and collaborating with families.

    This exam explores the many aspects of the profession of early childhood education, focusing on developmentally appropriate practices, types of programs, historical perspectives, ethics, current issues, and what it means to be a professional. The exam focuses on the ever-changing aspects of early childhood education, and how this creates both challenges and opportunities to overcome and explore on the students’ journeys in the profession of early childhood education.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).

    Literacy Development

    (ECE-320)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: describe the foundations of reading and writing processes; use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing and a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading and writing; engage students in literacy practices that develop awareness, understanding and respect for differences in their societies; create an environment that fosters development of reading and writing skills; and pursue the development of professional skills that enable students to effectively work with colleagues.

    The purpose of this exam is to enable new and veteran teachers to construct the knowledge, basic competencies, and dispositions needed to the reading and writing abilities of students in grades Pre-K to 8. Students explore the major approaches and techniques for developing literacy that research and practice have proven successful as well as the theory behind the methods to assist new and veteran teachers to choose, adapt, and/or construct those approaches and techniques that best fit their styles and teaching situations.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education (6/17).

    Literacy Instruction

    (EDU-510)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    November 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: evaluate foundational concepts related to reading and writing pedagogy for young children; critically analyze the influence of curriculum standards, social, and environmental factors on students’ learning outcome; incorporate emergent literacy and basic decoding strategies, including phonics, and syllabic analysis; determine how literacy acquisition is assessed; choose a verb that clearly articulates how students will achieve this objective; formulate how music and movement can be integrated into curricula; investigate the critical factors associated with literacy instruction and essential reading and writing strategies; investigate strategies for building vocabulary and other foundational literacy skills.

    The course includes completing a lesson plan, a comprehensive final examination, and assignments at the end of each chapter. The course presents major concepts and techniques related to research-based literacy instruction. Course participants develop an understanding of effective practices for teaching reading and writing. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to engage course participants in critical thought to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to effectively educate students of all ages. Students will gain a deeper understanding of best practices related to developing literacy. Additionally, students will explore the importance of curricula and proper assessment strategies in meeting the individualized needs of learners.

    In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Liberal Studies, Education, and Literacy (11/20).

    Literacy Instruction

    (EDU-250)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this learning experience, students will be able to: explain foundational concepts related to reading and writing pedagogy for young children; critically analyze the influence of curriculum standards, social, and environmental factors on students’ learning outcomes; discuss emergent literacy and basic decoding strategies, including phonics, and syllabic analysis; describe how literacy acquisition is assessed; discuss how music and movement can be integrated into curricula; investigate the critical factors associated with literacy instruction and essential reading and writing strategies, and investigate strategies for building vocabulary and other foundational literacy skills.

    This course helps students develop an understanding of effective practices for teaching reading and writing. Major topics include: concepts and techniques related to research-based literacy instruction, the importance of curricula and proper assessment strategies in meeting the individualized needs of learners. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Reading and Literacy Instruction (1/20).

    Music Education

    (ECE-302)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain the role that music and movement have in helping children to develop both physically and psychologically; critically analyze the influence of curriculum standards, social, and environmental factors on students’ learning outcomes; compare and contrast how infants and young children are assessed; describe how music and movement can be integrated into curricula that target early learners; identify the critical factors associated with creating a classroom environment that facilitates the inclusion of music and movement as learning strategies.

    This course teaches participants how to engage young children in active learning through the use of music and motor activities. Students develop an understanding of how to develop curriculum materials and learning environments that foster the mental and physical development of young children. The readings and practice materials are designed to engage course participants in critical thought to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are necessary to effectively educate young children. Students gain a deeper understanding of the important role that music and movement play in the academic, psychological, social, and physical development of children. Additionally, students explore the importance of curricula and proper assessment strategies in meeting the individualized needs of early learners.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Music and Movement (8/18).

    Supporting Children with Instructional Technology

    (EDU-320)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the shifting interactions of educators with students, schools, and technologies as a 21st century technology-using teacher; analyze key issues and trends in the field of educational technology while assessing your readiness to become a technology-using educator; explore ways unique, powerful technologies can transform teaching and learning in schools; integrate technology in planning, delivering, and evaluating learning experiences for students; develop strategies for successfully utilizing technology and creating change in schools as a teacher leader; teach students how to research and critically evaluate online information as responsible digital citizens; explore methods for using web-based information curation tools, digital content, and inquiry-based and exploratory learning websites and apps to develop online learning experiences demonstrate the ability to use physical and digital technologies, including apps, digital games, and simulations to promote problem solving and inquiry learning; analyze the use of blogs, wikis, Twitter, and classroom and teacher websites to enhance learning through online interaction and collaboration; utilize multimedia technologies innovatively and creatively to open access to learning for all students; explain how teachers can use digital technologies to differentiate instruction and promote learning success for all students, including culturally and linguistically diverse learners, students with special educational needs, and young writers from preschool to high school; and describe how teachers can use digital portfolios, polls and quiz games, student feedback surveys, democratic classrooms and other assessment strategies to involve teachers and students in self-evaluation and reflection of their learning.Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the shifting interactions of educators with students, schools, and technologies as a 21st century technology-using teacher; analyze key issues and trends in the field of educational technology while assessing your readiness to become a technology-using educator; explore ways unique, powerful technologies can transform teaching and learning in schools; integrate technology in planning, delivering, and evaluating learning experiences for students; develop strategies for successfully utilizing technology and creating change in schools as a teacher leader; teach students how to research and critically evaluate online information as responsible digital citizens; explore methods for using web-based information curation tools, digital content, and inquiry-based and exploratory learning websites and apps to develop online learning experiences demonstrate the ability to use physical and digital technologies, including apps, digital games, and simulations to promote problem solving and inquiry learning; analyze the use of blogs, wikis, Twitter, and classroom and teacher websites to enhance learning through online interaction and collaboration; utilize multimedia technologies innovatively and creatively to open access to learning for all students; explain how teachers can use digital technologies to differentiate instruction and promote learning success for all students, including culturally and linguistically diverse learners, students with special educational needs, and young writers from preschool to high school; and describe how teachers can use digital portfolios, polls and quiz games, student feedback surveys, democratic classrooms and other assessment strategies to involve teachers and students in self-evaluation and reflection of their learning.

    Supporting Children with Instructional Technology (EDU-320) will assist participants with developing the skills and competencies need to be successful as a 21st century teacher. Course participants will examine best practices for teaching and learning with various types of educational technology. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to help participants develop the skills that are necessary to design instruction with technology and effectively integrate technology into their classroom instruction. Course participants will gain a deeper understanding of how to use technology as a tool for supporting student centered instruction. Additionally, participants will explore strategies for assessing student learning through the use of technology.

    In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Early Childhood Education, Educational Leadership, Middle and Secondary Education, or Special Education (5/21).

    Teaching and Learning with Technology

    (EDU-372)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: create effective plans for integrating technology into instruction; design effective online learning environments; identify effective web-based tools and software for facilitating instruction; determine which types of educational technology are best suited for instructional activities; describe what makes a high-quality digital learning environment; analyze the advantages and potential issues with online instruction; describe strategies for leveraging technology to meet the needs diverse learners; demonstrate the ability to integrate web-based technologies into a lesson plan; discuss criteria for effectively using technology in the classroom; explain the strategies for troubleshooting and addressing issues with technology; explain how to design digital learning environments for different diverse learner; and describe how the use of technology in the classroom is likely to evolve in education.

    Teaching and Learning with Technology (EDU-372) will teach participants strategies for digital teaching and learning and best practices for integrating technology into their instructional practices. Course participants will examine best practices for teaching and learning with various types of educational technology. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to develop the skills that are necessary to delivery digital instruction and effectively integrate technology resources into their classroom instruction. Students will gain a deeper understanding of how to develop effective online and blended instruction. Additionally, students will explore strategies for assessing student learning through the use of technology.

    In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Early Childhood Education, Educational Leadership, Middle and Secondary Education, or Special Education (5/21).

    Teaching Elementary Social Studies

    (EDU-410)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: create effective plans for implementing social studies lessons in the elementary classroom; explain social studies education in regard to curriculum patterns, classroom environments, and roles of the teacher; investigate the role of democracy and citizenship in social studies education; describe strategies that promote a culturally responsive learning environment; explain how curriculum standards may be applied to the social studies disciplines; describe learner-, society-, and knowledge-centered approaches to organize a social studies curriculum; explain how social, emotional, cultural, and educational factors interact to influence English language development in school; analyze the sequential progress of lessons directed toward the development of a theme in an effective unit; identify direct and indirect instructional strategies that are used in effective learning environments; investigate authentic assessments that improve teaching and learning; describe strategies to improve metacognition and inquiry in the social studies classroom; describe how to differentiate instruction to meet the varied needs of English learners; synthesize a variety of projects that can be incorporated in an interdisciplinary unit of study; describe how students can become map-makers rather than map-readers; explain the importance of studying history; describe strategies that promote literacy in social studies curriculum; identify the keys to reflective thinking.

    Teaching Elementary Social Studies (EDU-410) will teach participants strategies and best practices for teaching social studies to elementary students. Course participants will examine instructional strategies that promote citizenship. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to develop the skills that are necessary the skills that are necessary to effectively deliver social studies education to elementary students. Students will gain a deeper understanding of instructional strategies and tools for classroom application. Additionally, students will explore strategies for developing lessons and units that align with district, state, and national standards.

    In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Early Childhood Education, Educational Leadership, Middle and Secondary Education (Social Studies), or Special Education (5/21).

    Teaching English as Second or Other Language

    (EDU-360)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain how cultural differences may affect the way your students respond to you and to your efforts to teach them; describe policy trends affecting English learner education; discuss theories that have been proposed to explain first and second language acquisition; explain how social, emotional, cultural, and educational factors interact to influence English language development in school; explain how curriculum standards may be applied in classrooms serving English learners; describe how to differentiate instruction to meet the varied needs of English learners; explain how English learners are assessed and for what purposes; give classroom examples of new literacies, and discuss how they can be used to benefit English learners; describe strategies that promote oral, vocabulary, literacy, and writing language development for English language learners; investigate classroom strategies that promote English learners’ early literacy development; analyze assessment strategies to determine students’ progress in English language acquisition; describe strategies that promote content area reading comprehension and writing; and explain how to differentiate instruction for English learners.

    Teaching English as Second or Other Language (EDU-360) will teach participants strategies and best practices for teaching English as a second or other language. Course participants will examine the factors that influence language and language acquisition. They will also learn about the population of English language learners (ELLs) in schools in the United States and their experiences. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to develop the skills that are necessary to effectively support ELL’s and implement best practices in ESOL education. Students will gain a deeper understanding oral language development and the process of learning to read and write in a foreign language. Additionally, students will explore strategies for supporting ELLs in content area reading and writing.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education or Teaching English as a Second Language. (5/21).

    Teaching Students with Learning & Behavior Disorders Needs

    (ECE-370)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define Inclusive Education and its importance as an educational practice; critically analyze the foundations of Special Education its historical trends, current practices, and emerging challenges; compare and contrast various special learning needs and how those needs influence instructional strategies employed by the teacher; analyze how collaboration and teaming can be used as tolls to more effectively implement best practices in Inclusive Education; investigate the critical factors associated with creating a classroom environment that facilitates effective content area instruction, behavior management, and assessment of student learning; understanding that science doesn’t happen in isolation but is connected to mathematics when the learning goals from each discipline and the student practice skills from both disciplines are linked; exploring how equity, diversity, and achievement gaps should be considered when guiding all children to learn science.

    Teaching Students with Learning & Behavior Disorders Needs (EDU-370) will teach participants how to create a learning environment that that meets the needs of children with exceptional learning needs and emotional-behavioral disorders. Course participants will develop an understanding of current best practices, historical trends, and emerging challenges related to educating students with exceptional learning needs and emotional-behavioral disorders. The readings and practice materials included in this course are designed to engage course participants in critical thought in order to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are necessary for the participant to meet the needs of exceptional learners and manage classrooms with students with and emotional-behavioral disorders. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the foundations of special education and the elements of effective inclusive education. Additionally, students will explore the importance of curricula, proper assessment strategies, and classroom management techniques in meeting the individualized needs of students with exceptional learning needs and emotional-behavioral disorders.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Special Education or Education (5/21).