Home » Page » Psychology

We offer distance learning courses that are recommended for college credit by the NCCRS in the following subjects:

Psychology

    Abnormal Psychology

    (PSY-302)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the development of abnormal psychology, assessment and diagnosis approach, and research methods; analyze the symptoms, prevalence, causes, and treatments for disorders related to anxiety, somatic, mood/suicide, and eating; discuss the impact of psychology on physical health, symptoms, prevalence, causes, and treatments for sexual addiction, impulse control, and personality/schizophrenia-related disorders; investigate neuro-developmental and neuro-cognitive disorders and the legal and ethical issues associated with mental health service provision.

    This self-study course explores the prevalence, symptoms, causes, and treatments related to major psychological disorders, including: anxiety, somatic, mood, eating, sleep cycle, stress, sexual, addiction, personality, and schizophrenia-related disorders. Other topics include: historical developments, assessment and diagnostic approaches, and research methods in the discipline, along with current legal and ethical perspectives. Detailed case studies and concept checks help students examine and apply what they have learned. Unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major (Version 2.0, August 2013).

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education programs (12/14).

    Active Learning and Body Language

    (PSY-400)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: assess the fundamental aspects of active listening; examine challenges distorted by negative automatic beliefs; identify how to build active listening skills to persuade others; explore the process of responding to emotionally charged nonverbal cues; describe what nonverbal communication is and how to decode it; examine the connection between nonverbal communication and the limbic brain; discuss the nonverbals of the torso, hips, abdomen, chest, and shoulders; identify how hand behavior is crucial to decoding nonverbal behaviors; and investigate the difficulties in accurately assessing deceptive behaviors.

    Active Learning and Body Language (PSY-400) introduces students to the principles of active listening and body language. The student will hone the skill of active listening and discover the importance of paraphrasing, emotional labeling, and validation. The students will learn techniques that will allow them to navigate difficult and emotionally charged situation. The student will learn about the use of nonverbals to establish trust, communicate authority and reveal the true feelings and motives of others.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (5/21).

    Child Development

    (PSY-230)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: examine the theoretical perspectives of child development; explain the influences of genes and the environmental factors in development; compare different birthing procedures and the describe the choices that are available to parents; analyze the developmental norms of an infant and child and how to interpret them; summarize how attachment affects an individual’s social competence; investigate the ways that preschool children are educated; describe the ways children grow during the school years and the factors that influence their growth; list the types of relationships and friendships that are typical of middle childhood; and analyze the factors that affect adolescent school performance during school transition times.

    This course provides an overview of the field of child and adolescent development. It covers childhood and adolescence chronologically, encompassing the prenatal period, infancy and toddlerhood, the preschool years, middle childhood, and adolescence. Within these periods, instruction focuses on physical, cognitive, and social and personality development.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (8/18).

    Educational Psychology

    (PSY-204)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the skills that make a good teacher and how to evaluate an intentional teacher; breakdown how children develop cognitively, socially and emotionally; examine the impact of culture on teaching and learning; analyze the principles of behavioral and cognitive learning; determine how direct instruction, student-centered and constructivist approaches to instruction influence intentional teaching; discuss the elements of effective instruction; investigate motivation for student performance; illustrate the characteristics of effective learning environments; identify learners with exceptionalities; assess student learning through standardized tests.

    This course is the systematic study of learners, learning, and teaching. It emphasizes cognitive, social and moral development while also focusing on educational diversity. Instruction also focuses on motivating students to learn, creating effective learning environments and assessing student learning.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education or Psychology (8/18).

    Family & Partnership Violence

    (PSY-385)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: investigate the violence against women from around the world; differentiate the four major types of violence that occurs in families; scrutinize the primary areas of child maltreatment: neglect, physical and sexual; distinguish the forms of sexual offending against minors; assess the health and safety issues that affects the survivors of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV); recognize how violence occurring in the LBGTI relationship is unique to the population; identify the characteristics of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV); investigate the categories of homicide in relation to Intimate Partner Violence (IPV); scrutinize the concepts and provisions of domestic violence orders of protection.

    Family & Partnership Violence (PSY-385)  introduces students to the crimes of family violence, covering offenders and offenses, impact on victims, and responses of the criminal justice system. The student will learn about adolescent and young adult victimization, as well as intimate partner violence, LGBTI population, and theoretical perspectives.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (5/21).

    Foundations of Psychological Testing

    (PSY-217)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of this learning experience, students will be able to: trace the history of psychological testing; identify the professional practice standards of associations and societies most relevant to psychological testing; evaluate different levels of measurement and the procedures for interpreting test scores; discuss the concept of a construct; examine the scientific approach to constructing, administering and using survey data; investigate how to develop and assess a test; and investigate using tests in educational, clinical, counseling and workplace settings.

    This course introduces students to the basics of psychological testing as well as psychometrics and statistics. The material focuses on the foundational concepts and issues using real-life examples and situations. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Psychological Testing (1/20).

    Foundations of Stress Management

    (PSY-310)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: distinguish how stress affects people physically, emotionally, mentally, spiritually, and socially; judge the capacity for handling the demands that are part of today’s world; practice how to prevent stress; discover how to reduce or cope successfully with unavoidable stress; appraise several different measures to assess personal stress; deduce that the body is designed to respond to acute stress predictably for one outcome-survival; evaluate the skills of “managing self-talk”, “stopping negative thoughts”, and “going with the flow” as mental tools to help prevent the activation of the stress response; assess values clarification to facilitate self-understanding; discover how to spend and save money to bring a lifetime of financial freedom; examine personal spiritual health; incorporate the behaviors of proper exercise, eating right, adequate sleep, and avoiding unhealthy behaviors to form a foundation of stress management; probe complementary and alternative therapies to expand roles in stress management and health promotion; formulate a plan that addresses a specific personality and the situations that determine the most effective tools to deal with stress.

    This course provides students with an understanding of stress management and prevention. Using an experiential approach; this course encourages the student to personalize the information through practical applications and stress-reducing resources that includes activities and assessments. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Health Studies, Human Development, or Social Sciences (4/19)

    Gerontology

    (PSY-330)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: investigate sociological and gerontological perspectives on aging; analyze the impact of an “aging” society through data analysis of demographic patterns and historical factors; compare sociological concepts and theories of aging through practical application; appraise cultural awareness of the aging population; evaluate conclusions from aging research through effective oral and written communication; and analyze and evaluate research related to aging.

    This course provides students with the ability to explore the social aspects of aging and how aging impacts individuals as well as communities, nations, and the world. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Health Studies, Human Development, or Social Sciences (4/19).

    History and Systems of Psychology ( Formerly History and Systems of Psychology (PSY-202) )

    (PSY-304)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe how psychology’s history is studied, its philosophical influences, its physiological influences, and the contributions of its founders; explain the theoretical tenets and empirical methods of structuralism, functionalism and applied psychology; investigate the theory and methods used in Behaviorism and Gestalt Psychology;discuss the contributions of psychoanalytic and humanistic theory and method, and the contemporary developments in psychology;and evaluate the relative merits of psychology’s major schools of thought and key studies in the history of psychology.

    This self-study course explores the history of psychology and major schools of thought. From the Greek philosophers to the contributions of modern schools of thought such as evolutionary psychology, students explore important theoretical and methodological movements in psychology such as structuralism, functionalism, applied psychology, behaviorism, and psychoanalysis. Students evaluate the relative merits of each of psychology’s approaches and deepen their knowledge of game-changing studies in the field. The unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major, version 2.0, August, 2013.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education (12/14).

    Human Growth and Development ( Formerly (PSY-301) )

    (PSY-203)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe developmental psychology’s theoretical perspectives and research methods, genetic and environmental influences on development, development in the womb, the birth process, and the characteristics of newborns; analyze research and theory regarding cognitive, emotional, and social childhood development; interpret research and theory regarding cognitive, emotional and social development in adolescence and early adulthood; investigate research and theory regarding cognitive, emotional, and social development in middle and late adulthood.

    This self-study course explores how humans develop cognitively, emotionally, and socially as they age. From prenatal development through infancy, childhood, and adulthood, cognitive, moral, physical, emotional, and social development are discussed. The foundations of the discipline and its research methods are also explored. The unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major, version 2.0, August, 2013.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science or Teacher Education (12/14).

    Introduction to Coaching

    (PSY-105)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: discover coaching and the coaching process; analyze listening skills to encourage thinking; examine how questions, paraphrasing and summarizing can provide clarity to the coaches; investigate the conversational framework of the coaching process; practice tools and techniques that are the foundation of the coaching conversation; analyze how body language is used in the coaching conversation; compare different activities related to talking, drawing and playing to increase the effectiveness of the coaching session; determine the elements of the concept a “coaching way of being;” and construct a coaching contract and ethical statement.

    This course provides students with coaching resources. The step-by-step style allows students to see the process and techniques to gain the critical skills needed to become a successful coach. Real-life coaching sessions provide examples to read and activities to complete to increase students’ skill levels. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the certificate/associate degree category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Human Development, Health and Sports Studies, or Educational Studies (4/19).

    Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

    (PSY-151)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of this learning experience, students will be able to: examine the definition of cognition and explore the historical developments and events; analyze the components of short term, long term, and the working-memory systems; explore how metacognition can help make cognitive processes more effective; explain how knowledge is stored and organized; analyze the factors of language formation and comprehension; examine several approaches that influence effective problem solving; and investigate several types of heuristics that guide the decision-making process.

    This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the field of cognitive psychology. Major topics include the perceptual processes, memory, imagery, general knowledge, and language. The material focuses on problem-solving and creativity, reasoning and decision making. Instructional methods include: study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Cognitive Psychology (1/20).

    Introduction to Forensic Psychology

    (PSY-215)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: distinguish forensic psychology from other forensic sciences; analyze the ways that psychology contributes to the investigation of crime; describe the role of forensic psychologists working in criminal and civil courts; examine the psychological effects of being victimized; summarize the role of psychologists and other mental health professionals in adult and juvenile corrections; identify the range of career opportunities available to forensic psychologists; and introduce the methods and procedures used in psychological assessments of juveniles.

    This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of forensic psychology. The material focuses on investigative psychology, family forensic psychology, and police and public safety psychology. Students develop a multicultural perspective with an ethnic and racial sensitivity, which is critical to the successful practice of forensic psychology. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Forensic Psychology, Psychology, Social Science, or  General Science (1/20).

    Introduction to Industrial and Organizational Psychology

    (PSY-216)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of this learning experience, students will be able to: explain the importance of work in people’s lives; explain why I-O psychology research is important to organizations; summarize the Five Factor Model of Personality and its links to job performance; identify the uses of job analysis information; identify the practical issues that affect staffing, including how to combine information in making a staffing decision; break down the importance and meaning of motivation and its links with performance; describe the major approaches used in organizations to reduce and manage stress; contrast the conditions under which employees feel justly treated in the performance evaluation process; and identify several reasons for the increasing use of teams in organizations.

    This course introduces students to the rich and intriguing nature of the modern workplace.  The material focuses on achieving the balance between work and non-work, leaders, and teams.  Major topics include: The Five Factor Model of Personality, emotional intelligence, culture and emotions, genetics and job satisfaction, measuring motivation, integrity testing, entrepreneurship, computer-based assessment, male versus female leaders and cross-cultural teams. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Business (1/20).

    Introduction to Neuropsychology

    (PSY-202)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of this learning experience, students will be able to: investigate brain-behavior relationships through the study of functional neuroanatomy; examine the history of the development of neuropsychology; examine the three main classes of neurotransmitters and receptors; describe the hierarchical levels of function in the central nervous system and the structure, organization, and connectivity of the cortex; discuss the nature of emotions and the cognitive processes; examine brain diseases that produce psychological disturbances; and analyze the purpose of and techniques used in assessment of neuropsychological functions.

    This course introduces students to the scientific exploration of human behavior from a neuroscientist’s perspective.  Students learn basic neuroanatomy and how distinct brain regions and networks of brain regions work to produce behaviors studied by psychologists. The material focuses on higher functions, such as memory and language, which require continual interaction of the different lobes; and examines abnormalities of the brain.  Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Neuropsychology, Psychology, Social Science, or General Science (1/20).

    Introduction to Psychology

    (PSY-101)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify key concepts, models, and principles regarding psychological research methods, human biology, consciousness, development and human diversity, and sensation and perception; demonstrate knowledge and apply the concepts of basic learning, memory, cognition, language, and intelligence concepts, structures, and processes; and explain key theories and research findings regarding emotions, stress, personality, and psychological disorders.

    This self-study course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of psychology and explores, through a psychological lens, theory and research related to neurological, biological, cognitive, sociological, cultural, and developmental phenomena. Other topics include: theoretical and empirical perspectives on personality and psychological disorders. The unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major (version 2.0, August, 2013).

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education (12/14).

    Introduction to Theories and Techniques of Play Therapy

    (PSY-340)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of this learning experience, students will be able to: compare and contrast essential people, theorists, and organizations that shaped the history of the profession of play therapy; compare and contrast the most widely accepted theoretical models of play therapy; identify developmentally appropriate play therapy toys and materials; identify and differentiate play therapy techniques with children who have been traumatized; examine and discuss play therapy techniques for use with anxiety, ADHD and other mental disorders; define the ethical issues that are unique to play therapy; and examine issues of diversity and how they impact play therapy, from choice of materials to the relationship with the client.

    This course introduces students to essential elements and principles of play therapy, including history, modalities, techniques, applications, and skills. Topics include a variety of play therapy theoretical orientations and specific skills, which can be used when working with children and their families using the developmentally appropriate setting of play.  Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, Counseling, Teacher Education, or General Science (1/20).

    Jewish Rabbinical Counseling

    (PSY-308)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply best practices and strategies of pastoral counseling; identify various mental health care professionals, their expertise and how each could help a counselee; comfort the ill and bereaved in an effective and sensitive manner; counsel children and adults who have undergone recent trauma; identify potential addictions and abuse and pursue the proper steps to recovery; describe a variety of mental illnesses and the proper handling of patients suffering from them; help prepare people for marriage; and make counseling decisions based on an awareness of confidentiality laws.

    This course examines rabbinical counseling practices and descriptions of typical mental health issues that may be encountered and the various professionals and services available for referral, including premarital counseling, dealing with couples in distress and spousal abuse and caring for the sick, the dying, and the bereaved. Special focus is given to dealing with suicide and survivors of crises as well as children in matters of crisis and death. Although many of the sources speak to the role of the communal rabbi or chaplain, many of the skills are equally applicable to other spiritual counselors, teachers and mentors.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Psychology, Sociology, Counseling, or Rabbinics (8/18).

    Medical Marijuana

    (PSY-235)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2020 - Present


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: examine the historical context of the marijuana plant and its uses; examine the role of the endocannabinoid system; analyze the history of medical marijuana; investigate the choices for the delivering of marijuana into the body; examine the variety of medical marijuana strains and their applications; investigate the benefits of medical marijuana on medical and mental health disorders; investigate what cannabidiol (CBD) is and the medical benefits that it can provide; and clarify how CBD products are made and applied.

    Major topics include: an introduction to the understanding and use of medical marijuana, the marijuana culture and history, uses of marijuana and the treatable conditions when considering medical marijuana, and common applications for CBD and the difference in CBD from THC.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health and Wellness, Psychology, Sociology, Nutrition Science, Health Care Administration, Medical Assisting, Allied Health, Business Development, Alternative Medicine, Counseling, or Social Work (4/20).

    Pathophysiology and Pharmacology

    (SCI-311)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    June 2017 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology and Allied Health


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe various pharmaceutical milestones that occurred throughout the 1800-1900s, the origin and content of the various drug consumer safety laws, and function of the FDA; differentiate between the chemical, generic, and trade/brand names of a drug; identify the various forms in which drugs are manufactured; explain the difference between various types of tablets, and distinguish an ointment, cream, or lotion; describe and differentiate the 10 different routes of drug administration, the advantages, and disadvantages of each; describe how the liver metabolizes drugs, and how doses are adjusted for patients with liver or kidney diseases, elderly, or premature infants; identify the seven rights of drug administration, how to reverse drug toxicity, and recognize certain drugs allergies, and drug-food interactions; discuss therapeutic effects of the different categories of drugs used to treat urinary, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, cardiac, pulmonary, hematologic, gynecologic, endocrine, neurologic, psychiatric, ophthalmic, ENT (ear, nose, and throat), analgesic conditions; identify the component parts of the immune response, and how vaccines work; and compare and contrast how local, regional, spinal, and epidural anesthesia drugs are given.

    Pathophysiology and Pharmacology is an introduction to the world of drugs and pharmaceuticals for students who intend to enter the healthcare profession. The course discusses common drugs for various ailments and their chemical structures and introduces students to the processes by which various drugs are indicated and administered.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Nursing, Healthcare, or Health-wellness educator (6/17).

    Patient Advocacy

    (PSY-370)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology and Allied Health


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: analyze the importance of health advocacy; investigate the techniques for utilizing various forms of media, whether print, television, or online; describe the legislative process of advocacy; examine how to refer a patient for legal help, create a medical-legal partnership and advocate for policy changes; examine class action for health professionals; analyzing the benefits of using research for policy change; examine the methods to identify and approach a community organization; and examine the roles and responsibilities of fundraising.

    Major topics include: an introduction to the issues required for community mental health advocates, including the legislative process, approaches for using the media, when to seek an attorney, when to litigate, working with family and community, and funding strategies.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Care Administration, Psychology and Sociology, Allied Health, Health and Wellness, or Counseling and Social Work (4/20).

    Physiological Psychology

    (PSY-303)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe key principles of physiological psychology, psychopharmacology, physiological research methods, and the critical role of the nervous system; analyze the physiology behind sensation, perception, sleeping, eating, and feeling; evaluate the physiology of learning, memory, and communication processes; and explain physiological factors involved in neurological, anxiety-related, schizophrenia-related, and addictive disorders.

    This self-study course explores physiological psychology, which relate to the biological influences on human and animal behavior. Topics include structures and functions of the nervous system, psychopharmacology and research methods, the senses, movement, emotion, eating/digestion, learning, memory, and the neurology of psychological disorders. The unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major (version 2.0, August, 2013).

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education (12/14).

    Principles of Social Skills Through Behavior Modification

    (PSY-415)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: assess the types of behavioral assessment; describe the factors that influence the effectiveness of reinforcement; explain the principles of punishment; examine a behavior chain and how to develop a chain procedure; identify the four components of behavioral skill training; examine problem behaviors through functional assessments; understand the use of punishment techniques; discuss the strategies that can be used to promote the generalization of behavior change; examine the different types of self-management strategies; and examine the components of a behavioral contract.

    Principles of Social Skills Through Behavior Modification (PSY-415) introduces students to the principles of social skills through behavior modification. Students will learn a step-by-step approach that includes practical information on the technologies used to measure and record behavior changes. The student will learn about different reinforcement methods and implement social changes using self-management strategies and behavioral modification.

    In the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (5/21).

    Psychology of Personality

    (PSY-152)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: examine Freud’s theories of personality development; examine analytical psychology with Jungian levels of the psyche and his eight major archetypes; investigate the developmental theory of Erik Erikson; analyze Fromm’s basic assumptions about personality; examine Maslow’s five assumptions regarding motivation; probe the basic assumptions of Carl Roger’s person-centered theory; investigate Allport’s definition of personality; distinguish between the Big Five as a taxonomy and as a theory; analyze Eysenck’s approach to the measurement of personality; assess the contributions of E. L. Thorndike and J. B. Watson and BF Skinner; and evaluate Mischel’s conditional view of personal dispositions.

    Major topics include: an introduction to theories of personality. Students are given a comprehensive foundation on the nature of personality theory, as well as its contributions to science. Coverage of each theory encompasses a biographical sketch of each theorist, related research, and applications to real life.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology or Counseling (4/20).

    Research Methods in Psychology

    (PSY-201)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2014 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe psychological research method goals, processes, descriptive techniques, and correlational techniques; explain the principles of experimentation, the role of variables, and the types of validity and reliability; apply knowledge of experimental design and small-N experimentation; investigate quasi-experimental design, results interpretation, and results presentation; plan, conduct, interpret and disseminate original research.

    This self-study course is designed to introduce students to research methods in psychology. Students learn the goals and processes of research and descriptive and correlational approaches to research. After learning about the basic principles of experimentation and the concepts of reliability and validity, students plan and conduct simple and complex experiments using between- and within-group designs, small-n designs, and quasi-experimental designs. Students also learn to disseminate research through research reports and oral/written presentations. The unit objectives in this course are aligned with the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for the Undergraduate Major (version 2.0, August, 2013).

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Social Science, General Science, or Teacher Education (12/14).

    Seminary of Integration

    (PSY-450)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2020 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology and Allied Health


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: investigate the ethical and legal issues in the counseling practice; illustrate the counseling process and approaches to helping clients; analyze how crisis counseling differ from traditional counseling; assess how mental health counseling provides a broad overview of the general mental health settings and client issues; examine the characteristics of working as a professional counselor in schools, universities and career counseling; evaluate the principles of cultural diversity into the counseling process; investigate how treatment plans outline counseling outcomes expectations and interventions; investigate the theory and practical applications of supervision and consultation; examine why professional advocacy important; and examine outcome research to increase treatment efficacy.

    Major topics include: general professional issues including advocacy and multicultural counseling, procedures for licensure, professional associations, ethical/legal issues, crisis intervention, consultation, supervision and research.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology or Introduction to Counseling (4/20).

    Social Psychology

    (PSY-315)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    August 2018 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    At the end of this course, students will be able to: describe foundational research regarding social context factors and social motives by examining the historical evolution of the field of social psychology; interpret how social cognition and self-concept via introspection and observation impacts self-control; examine the impact of cognitive dissonance and how attitudes can change based on the social context; determine the impacts of conformity and group process within the field of social psychology; analyze Evolutionary Psychology’s and Social Exchange Theory’s explanation of prosocial behaviors; and illustrate situational and social causes of aggression and prejudice.

    This course is a dynamic study of how peoples’ thoughts, feelings and actions are affected by others. Major topics include: attitudes, prejudice, conformity, groups, interpersonal attraction and prosocial behaviors.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology or Psychology (8/18).

    Sport and Exercise Psychology

    (PSY-318)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Exercise Science


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the background for sport and exercise psychology and related employment opportunities; propose effective teaching, coaching, and training practices for diverse participants; examine environmental influences that affect sport and exercise participants; describe group cohesion, team dynamics, leadership, and communication; design a skills training program to enhance individual performance; examine behavior change techniques that increase motivation and combat negative physical and mental health issues; and facilitate psychological growth and character development.

    This course provides students with an understanding of the scientific and professional practice of sport and exercise psychology and assists student comprehension through research, concepts, and theories of people and their behaviors to think critically of the practical application of that knowledge. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Physical Education, Exercise Science, Sport Psychology, Health and Wellness, or Nutrition (4/19).

    The Psychology of Motivation and Emotion

    (PSY-372)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: evaluate the 10 unifying themes of motivation and emotion; scrutinize the fundamentals of regulation for physiological, psychological and homeostasis; investigate how learned helplessness is built on outcome expectancies; distinguish implicit motives related to acquired and achievement needs; identify the motivational intervention strategy of goal striving; analyze the six dimensions of psychological wellbeing related to self-concept; differentiate how to control emotions and the difference between emotion and mood; compare the study of emotions from the cognitive and social aspects; scrutinize the three state of interventions to enrich motivational and emotional resources; and determine the traits of self-actualization and the humanistic motivational phenomena.

    The Psychology of Motivation and Emotion (PSY-372) introduces students the roots of motivation, emotional processes at work, and the impacts on learning, performance, and well-being. The student will learn about the framework to understand motivation and emotions, physiological needs, implicit motives, the nature of emotions and positive psychology.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (5/21).

    Understanding ADHD

    (PSY-365)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology and Allied Health


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: assess the biological and cultural aspects of ADHD; describe how ADHD and addictions can be formed; explore the impacts of learning and mental health issues due to an ADHD diagnosis; analyze the impact that the brain’s cerebellum plays in ADHD; examine the ways to assess the impact of ADHD behaviors; assess the impact of the environment on ADHD; examine the risks and benefits of using medications; identify the steps to create a family-school collaboration; examine how to handle the emotions of ADHD.

    Understanding ADHD (PSY-365) introduces students to the principles of ADHD. Students explore the ADHD brain and the impacts that the environment, nutrition, and sleep have on symptoms of children with ADHD. Students also learn about the use of medications and how to deal with school and family life.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (5/21).

    Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect

    (PSY-380)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Psychology and Allied Health


    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: summarize the early efforts to protect abused and neglected children; assess child sexual abuse, including the categories into which it can be divided; analyze incest and explain how society might contribute to it; investigate child pornography and how it fits into the category of child sex trafficking; classify the types of interviewing used during intervention; categorize the roles of law enforcement, medical, educational, and mental health professionals who might be involved in child abuse cases; distinguish the phases that a family goes through during intervention and treatment for child sexual abuse; analyze some therapeutic approaches to treating adults abused or neglected as children; and summarize the types of prevention in child maltreatment and the current philosophy and goals of prevention.

    Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect (PSY-380) introduces students to child maltreatment. This course covers the symptoms of abuse and neglect, social services interventions, and the services available for children. The student will learn about case management, working with families from diverse cultural backgrounds and sex trafficking.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology (5/21).