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We offer distance learning courses that are recommended for college credit by the NCCRS in the following subjects:

Fashion Merchandising

    Foundations of Fashion Styling

    (FAS-205)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Fashion Merchandising


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: recognize and identify the roles and responsibilities of a fashion stylist before and during a photo shoot; compare and contrast the three primary areas that encompass fashion styling; define industry terms to enhance professional communications as a stylist; identify personality traits and must-have skills of successful stylists; deconstruct an editorial fashion shoot and infer from fashion calendars and magazine timetables how to prepare for a photo shoot; describe the duties of a wardrobe stylist and how the job duties differ from a fashion stylist; apply the basic principles of design and create apparel and non-apparel looks utilizing methods of styling; explain the classifications of personal style; compile a list of potential careers in fashion styling; learn the aspects of building a professional styling portfolio; and develop a business plan for a styling business including how to build a client base and market a styling business.

    This course introduces students to the role of styling and the business of and career tracks within fashion styling, including their own business or the film and entertainment industry. Major topics include: work and and responsibilities of the fashion stylist and wardrobe stylist, shopping and prepping merchandise, working with models on test shoots or photo shoots, styling professionalism, building a professional portfolio, social media, marketing, professional communications, sources of cultural inspiration and historical references. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the associate/certificate degree category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fashion Merchandising (4/19).

    Introduction to Fashion Merchandising

    (FAS-301)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Fashion Merchandising


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the nature of fashion; define and use basic vocabulary of the fashion industry; list and articulate each level of the industry and summarize how each level fits into the industry; recognize and give examples of the basic principles relating to fashion, its movement and influences including sociological, economic, psychological and environmental; discuss some of the historical development of apparel fashions; recognize specific segments within the fashion industry and describe how merchandising differs from sector to sector; identify and classify different forms of in-store and non-store retailing, their appropriate use, advantages and disadvantages; articulate the role the fashion industry plays in the global society; locate the significant and supporting domestic fashion centers in the United States and abroad and the varying roles they play in the apparel industry; identify and describe potential careers in each segment of the fashion industry; and describe the various types of retail distributors and fashion support services and explain how they service the merchants of fashion.

    This course provides exposure to the terminology, activities, and operations that make up the apparel and non-apparel fashion industry and the forces, people, and environments who influence it. Major topics include: historical and contemporary influences on fashion, an overview of the levels in the industry, including raw materials, product development, retailing, and ancillary services, motivations of dress, theories of fashion adoption, and the fashion life cycle, fashion statements and forecast fashion trends, international and domestic fashion markets, how fashion is conceived, marketed, and sold. Career possibilities are presented for varying segments of the industry. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Fashion Business or Fashion Merchandising (4/19).

    Jewish Participation in the Garment Industry

    (HIS-302)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    History and Political Science


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: trace the historical development of the Jewish presence in the garment industry in the United States, England, and Germany; compare and contrast the development of the Jewish garment industry in the United States and England and explain reasons for the differences; identify challenges that Jews faced in the garment industry; discuss the role of societal attitudes towards fashion in the development of the Jews in the garment industry; describe the role of anti-Semitism in the Jewish relationship with the garment industry in the United States, England, and Germany; differentiate between the garment industry in New York as compared to smaller centers like Rochester, and between the growth of the mens wear and womens wear industries; connect major historical events to the development of the position of Jews in the garment industry; and identify reasons given for the economic success of Jewish immigrants in the United States and what this means to other immigrant groups.

    This course examines the role of Jews in the garment and fashion industries, from simple laborers to manufacturers and department store owners and designers. The course focuses mainly on Jewish immigrants to the United States and their role in the garment industry from approximately 1840-1950. Major topics include: the Jewish role in the garment industry in England and Germany during a similar time frame; the development of the garment industry in New York and how that compares and contrasts to smaller centers such as Rochester and Cincinnati; consequences of significant historical events, such as the Gold Rush, the Civil War, the Progressive Era, and World War II, the impact of anti-Semitism, culminating with the Nazi destruction of the German fashion industry, justification to explain Jewish success in the garment industry and how it affected immigrant economic progress. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History, Jewish History, Judaic Studies, Sociology, or Anthropology (4/19).

    The Social Psychology of Dress

    (FAS-201)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    April 2019 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Fashion Merchandising


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe how meanings of dress vary from society to society; explain the common purposes that dress serves (i.e., to protect, to communicate, or to personally satisfy); interpret scholarly publications about dress and ideas of research topics regarding dress; evaluate clothing as a form of human behavior, considering the social and cognitive factors influencing the management and perception of personal appearance in everyday life; assess the importance of social and cultural context in the creation and interpretation of clothing symbolism; differentiate psychological, sociological and anthropological perspectives of dress that influence appearance management; compare and contrast concepts and methods appropriate for the study of appearance in contemporary societies; and analyze how cultural and societal factors influence dress behaviors.

    This course provides students with basic concepts and theories from social psychology applied to dress and its connection to human behavior. Major topics include: how dress reflects self-feelings, clothing as part of a nonverbal communication system and how it relates to human behavior changes and communicates gender, race, religion, and position establishes social identities and affects interpersonal encounters. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam.

    In the associate/certificate degree category OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Psychology, or Fashion Merchandising (4/19).

    Visual Merchandising

    (FAS-305)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2019 – Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Fashion Merchandising


    Upon successful completion of this learning experience, students will be able to: identify and analyze the effectiveness of retail window displays based on design elements used to create a display; apply the elements and principles of design to visual merchandising; identify fixtures, props, signage, mannequins and display furnishings used in retail stores; demonstrate understanding of the color wheel and identify color terminology; analyze a retail store layout by completing a retail store audit; create a 2-dimensional store planogram using appropriate computer-aided design software; plan or create a 3-dimensional shadow box or window display; critique the visual and operational elements of a fashion show; track, analyze, and interpret trends in visual merchandising and anticipate future needs within the industry; and research themes and visual presentations to develop additional design concepts.

    This course provides an overview of visual merchandising. Students learn how to design a customer experience in brick and mortar stores and translate brand identity through design basics. Major topics include: the importance of design elements including line, composition, color and lighting, fashion shows and special events. Instructional methods include: Study guide, required readings, and a final exam

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Visual Merchandising or Visual Communication (1/20).