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We offer distance learning courses that are recommended for college credit by the NCCRS in the following subjects:

Business and Economics

Education Courses

Psychology

    Foundations of Special Education for Students with Disabilities from Grade 7 through 12

    (EDU-215)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2024 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: develop a teaching philosophy that reflects appropriate attitudes toward working with secondary students with disabilities, delays, and/or risks and their families; outline the state and federal laws, legislations, and regulations relative to early intervention and education of secondary students with disabilities, delays, and/or risks and their families; identify and discuss the multicultural perspectives related to early intervention and inclusive education of older children with disabilities, delays, and/or risks and their families; summarize and discuss the roles of those who work with and on the behalf of older children with disabilities, delays, and/or risks and their families; discuss the definition, prevalence, identification, and characteristics of older children with disabilities, delays, and/or risks; compare the evidence‐based practices for working with older children with disabilities, delays, and/or risks and explain how assessment of secondary students with special needs varies from a child without special needs.

    This undergraduate course provides a historical and contemporary overview of the special education process while focusing on various types of learners with special needs including students with disabilities, gifted learners, and children at risk. Topics include legal requirements and laws, partnering with parents/families, categories of exceptionality, identification and intervention, collaboration, and research-based best practices, including Response to Intervention (RTI) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL).

    In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Special Education, Educational Studies, or Educational Psychology (3/24).

    Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Disabilities from Grade 7 to 12

    (EDU-325)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    March 2024 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Education


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: discuss teacher-directed instructional activities that can be applied in a classroom setting with secondary students who have been identified as having diverse learning needs; explain how to adapt an existing lesson plan to meet the diverse developmental needs of described learners; describe the specialized and general reading, writing, and mathematics methods used in inclusive and specialized educational settings; outline how to prepare an Individualized Education Program (IEP) for a described secondary student with special learning needs; summarize the evidence-based instructional strategies that can be used to meet the individual and diverse developmental needs of students with exceptionalities; and contrast the components of a comprehensive instructional plan including a PLAAFP statement, IEP goals, accommodations, and a lesson plan for a student with an exceptionality.

    This undergraduate course is designed to teach students how to develop and discuss the utilization of appropriate classroom procedures, strategies, methods, curriculum, and materials for teaching secondary students with learning, emotional, and intellectual disabilities along with other areas of exceptional educational needs. The IEP process and writing of student-appropriate IPEs will be  presented, reviewed, discussed, and applied in this course. Topics include how to teach reading, written language, and mathematics to students with exceptionalities.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Special Education, Educational Studies, Educational Psychology, Social Behavioral Sciences, or Curriculum and Instruction (3/24).

    Managerial Economics

    (ECO-500)

    $250.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2022 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Business and Economics


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe how managerial economics is applied; discuss why aggression analyze is used in decision-making; define optimization and utility and how they relate to consumer consumer behavior; assess the relationships between short-run and long-run costs and how they impact consumer pricing; define perfectly competitive markets and explain how they are impacted by substitution; and explain uniform pricing and how it relates to price discrimination and total revenue.

    This graduate-level course is concerned with the application of economic principles to key management decisions within organizations and provides guidance to increase value creation and allows a better explanation of the external business environment in which organizations operate. The primary purpose of the course is to develop tools useful in other Anderson courses: economics is a key foundation for much of what is taught in finance, marketing, business strategy and virtually every other course in the MBA program. Managerial Economics is fundamentally a unique way of thinking about problems, issues, and decisions that managers face in each of the functional areas of their organization. This unique way of thinking stresses the importance of incentives as determinants of human behavior and performance and emphasizes the consideration of costs and benefits as an efficient method for reaching economic decisions.

    In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Managerial Economics, Advanced Micro Economics, Economics or Business (6/22).

    Introduction to Philosophy

    (PHL-101)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    May 2023 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Philosophy


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: outline the major periods and the major figures in the history of Western philosophy; analyze the basic problems of philosophy in the fields of metaphysics, axiology, and epistemology; summarize the views of philosophers as expressed in philosophical texts; and evaluate the ways in which philosophers attempt to solve the problems of philosophy.

    Introduction to Philosophy introduces students to the major goals, nature, and methods of philosophy. The course focuses on issues concerning philosophical theories of knowledge and reality, drawing on ideas from a variety of disciplines. Topics include the nature of philosophy, the problem of skepticism and knowledge, and mind and personal identity. Emphasis is on the nature of philosophy and its relation to education, logic, and critical thinking.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Philosophy (5/23).

    The History of Board Games

    (HIS-380)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    May 2023 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    History and Political Science


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: identify the origins of board games and their significance in American culture; compare and analyze the themes in a variety of games; compare and contrast virtual board games and the role they play in modern day socialization and define the design elements in modern day board games that make them intriguing and appealing to a large demographic population.

    The History of Board games explores the origins and design of a variety of games and their significance in American and European culture. Topics include the integration of dice into many games, strategic race games, games of alignment and linear connection and dimensional variants. Popular games including chess, checkers, Monopoly, Backgammon, Chutes and Ladders, Connect and Scrabble are studied.

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in History, Liberal Arts, or Social Science (5/23).

    Living with Art

    (ART-225)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    May 2023- Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Art and Music


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: explain the various theories and concepts concerning a drawing; summarize the techniques and processes used to develop a work of art; describe the basic terminology of each genre of art; discuss the structure and composition of various art forms; and explain how art is a reflection of and is influenced by culture, values, and history.

    Living with Art provides students with the concepts, terminology, principles, theories and the general issues relevant to a specific work of art and the work’s historical context.  Students examine the attitudes and philosophies related to creative production in the visual arts and help develop a positive attitude to the arts through the study of theory, styles of art history, structure and periods of art, combined with an active art gallery program and a variety of studio projects.

    In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Art, Art Appreciation, Design, or Studio Art (5/23).

    Color Consulting and Theory for the Home and Business

    (ART-303)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    May 2023- Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Art and Music


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: define how creating color palettes using color theory and client preferences can enhance a home and business; describe how lighting and undertones affect color choices; apply the use of the color wheel, color terminology, and color schemes; describe color psychology and how it affects color choices in the home and office; define and describe how to build custom colors; and describe the flow and focal points in a home and how this is affected by color choices.

    Color Consulting and Theory for the Home and Business teaches students how to create color palettes to enhance an interior space. Topics include developing and using a color palette to bring life to a room and office, utilizing new or existing furniture, appliances, flooring, and interior painting, and working with clients to achieve balance and harmony. Color psychology will be explored, as well as how lighting and undertones affect color choices to train the eye to identify colors.

    In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Design or Studio Art (5/23).

    Research Methods in Health Services Management

    (HCR-550)

    $200.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    May 2023 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Allied Health


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: explain the role of research and its impact on the delivery of care; discuss the purpose of research philosophy and language; apply established procedures in the development of a research study framework; develop innovative and important questions and hypothesis in the field of health services research, based on the research study outline; outline the topics related to observation and measurement, including reliability and validity implications; contrast the different types of research methodologies and/or designs, their strengths and weaknesses; identify inherent threats to internal and external validity; select an appropriate research methodology or design to answer the questions of a health service investigation; interpret the different survey techniques in the area of health services research; compare the different types of data frequently used in health service, as well as their strengths and weaknesses or limitations; increase the capacity to read and critically analyze the literature on health services, including research questions, research design, methodologies, and conclusions; analyze research studies to pinpoint key methods, parties, safeguards, measures and outcomes; search for and locate research relevant to a health care issue of the students’ choosing; discriminate amongst definitions of key vocabulary in health services research methodology; and apply research methodology frameworks to pending health services management issues.

    Research Methods in Health Services Management exposes students to the scope of health services and health policy research, addresses such topics as developing conceptual models, understanding, and using different research designs, sampling survey design, carrying out community-oriented and policy-oriented research, and the ethical conduct of research. The course includes an analysis of various research design, methodologies, quantitative and qualitative research studies and provides students with the ability to draft and prepare applied research reports to help management with the decision-making process. Prerequisite: Concepts in Math and Quantitative Analysis (MAT-301).

    In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Nursing, Human Services, Hospital Administration, Health Service Administration, Undergraduate Public Health, Health Informatics, Clinical Health Sciences, Social Sciences or similar healthcare occupational (clinical practice) programs (5/23).

    Advanced Auditing

    (ARC-202)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Interior Design


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the process of decluttering; analyze the need for organization in both the home and business environment; determine the importance of tactile and kinesthetic objects and equipment; and apply the techniques as taught to create a comfortable and inviting space in which to both work and live in.

    Home and Office Organization (ARC-202) is an undergraduate self-study course that culminates with a project and a final exam. This course examines the evolution of organization, utilization of space, techniques, and concepts for making the best use of home and office layout. Minimalism and the psychological effect of decluttering and organizing are discussed.

    improve student learning. The course discusses methods for planning assessments that are integrated with instruction, crafting assessment tools, crafting scoring rubrics, formative assessment and feedback, grading and evaluating students, assessing higher-order thinking, interpreting state-mandated and other standardized test scores, and aligning assessment with state standards. The course also discusses attributes of assessment practices such as reliability and validity.

    In the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours in Interior Design (6/22).

    Home and Office Organization

    (ARC-202)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Interior Design


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the process of decluttering; analyze the need for organization in both the home and business environment; determine the importance of tactile and kinesthetic objects and equipment; and apply the techniques as taught to create a comfortable and inviting space in which to both work and live in.

    Home and Office Organization (ARC-202) is an undergraduate self-study course that culminates with a project and a final exam. This course examines the evolution of organization, utilization of space, techniques, and concepts for making the best use of home and office layout. Minimalism and the psychological effect of decluttering and organizing are discussed.

    improve student learning. The course discusses methods for planning assessments that are integrated with instruction, crafting assessment tools, crafting scoring rubrics, formative assessment and feedback, grading and evaluating students, assessing higher-order thinking, interpreting state-mandated and other standardized test scores, and aligning assessment with state standards. The course also discusses attributes of assessment practices such as reliability and validity.

    In the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours in Interior Design (6/22).

    Universal Design, Creating Inclusive Environments

    (ARC-101)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    December 2021 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Interior Design


    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the relationship between construction, accessibility, and barriers to inclusion; explain the importance of using environmentally acceptable materials for construction; identify how individuals examining needs for accessibility are evaluated and executed; and compare and contrast changing and evolving societal perceptions when building accessibility modifications.

    Universal Design, Creating Inclusive Environments (ARC-101) is an undergraduate self-study course that culminates with a final exam. The course  examines the history of technology and design interventions that can be a barrier and facilitator for usability. Topics include barriers that may not be complete obstacles but may be a resistance of some sort and can include narrow doorways, congestion, steps, and ramps.

    improve student learning. The course discusses methods for planning assessments that are integrated with instruction, crafting assessment tools, crafting scoring rubrics, formative assessment and feedback, grading and evaluating students, assessing higher-order thinking, interpreting state-mandated and other standardized test scores, and aligning assessment with state standards. The course also discusses attributes of assessment practices such as reliability and validity.

    In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Interior Design, Architecture, or Interior Architecture (6/22).

    The Art of Film Watching

    (COM-210)

    $150.00


    Location:
    Various: distance learning format


    Length:
    Varies (self-study; self-paced)


    Dates:
    May 2023 - Present.


    Instructional Delivery Format:
    Online/distance learning


    Category:
    Cultural Studies


    Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: describe the fundamental principles of film form and style, including narrative features, cinematography, editing, and sound; outline the basic formal elements of several film genres and film types, across a range of classic and contemporary U.S. and foreign films, including black-and-white, silent, and/or subtitled movies; analyze to describe what students see and hear when they watch a movie; discuss and write critically and effectively about the ways films move us aesthetically, intellectually, and emotionally.

    The Art of Film Watching introduces students to film aesthetics through the analysis of film form and style. The course aims to provide students with fluency in and understanding of film’s unique language as it evolves technologically, historically and generically. Beyond teaching students how to recognize and describe formal choices and techniques, students will be asked to engage in close readings of films, attending to the greater aesthetic significance and stakes of formal choices and innovations evident within a particular film, directorial oeuvre, period, or movement.

    improve student learning. The course discusses methods for planning assessments that are integrated with instruction, crafting assessment tools, crafting scoring rubrics, formative assessment and feedback, grading and evaluating students, assessing higher-order thinking, interpreting state-mandated and other standardized test scores, and aligning assessment with state standards. The course also discusses attributes of assessment practices such as reliability and validity.

    In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Liberal Arts, Communications or Film Studies (5/23).